Evann Normandin

Evann Normandin Evann is an avid performer with a background in literature and dramaturgy, and she is excited to join the DC BroadwayWorld team! Evann graduated with a double major in Theatre and English and American Literatures from Middlebury College in January 2015, and an MSc in Literature and Modernity from the University of Edinburgh in November 2016.



MOST POPULAR ARTICLES
LAST 30 DAYS

BWW Review: WHEN WE WERE YOUNG AND UNAFRAID Ignites Conversation at The Keegan TheatreBWW Review: WHEN WE WERE YOUNG AND UNAFRAID Ignites Conversation at The Keegan Theatre
Posted: Jun. 30, 2017


BWW Review: NIGHT SEASONS Embraces the Charmingly Quotidian at Quotidian Theatre CompanyBWW Review: NIGHT SEASONS Embraces the Charmingly Quotidian at Quotidian Theatre Company
Posted: Jul. 16, 2017


LAST 365 DAYS

BWW Review: WHEN WE WERE YOUNG AND UNAFRAID Ignites Conversation at The Keegan TheatreBWW Review: WHEN WE WERE YOUNG AND UNAFRAID Ignites Conversation at The Keegan Theatre
Posted: Jun. 30, 2017


BWW Review: NIGHT SEASONS Embraces the Charmingly Quotidian at Quotidian Theatre CompanyBWW Review: NIGHT SEASONS Embraces the Charmingly Quotidian at Quotidian Theatre Company
Posted: Jul. 16, 2017


BWW Review: NIGHT SEASONS Embraces the Charmingly Quotidian at Quotidian Theatre CompanyBWW Review: NIGHT SEASONS Embraces the Charmingly Quotidian at Quotidian Theatre Company
July 16, 2017

Horton Foote's NIGHT SEASONS, directed by Jack Sbarbori at the Quotidian Theatre Company, examines the nature of a life defined by money and greed, and the notion that perhaps living is the greatest punishment of all. Foote, best known for his 1962 screenplay for To Kill a Mockingbird, delivers a quiet critique of capitalist culture and asks us to consider what "home" means. NIGHT SEASONS places us in Harrison Texas, 1963 on Josie Weems' (Jane Squier Bruns) 93rd birthday, though the play deals in flashbacks and the setting easily slips back and forth through 1923-1963 and the years in between. Josie Weems (Jane Squier Bruns) is the manipulative glue that holds the rambling Weems family together by subtly managing finances and allowing and prohibiting marriages at her discretion.

BWW Review: WHEN WE WERE YOUNG AND UNAFRAID Ignites Conversation at The Keegan TheatreBWW Review: WHEN WE WERE YOUNG AND UNAFRAID Ignites Conversation at The Keegan Theatre
June 30, 2017

The DC premiere of WHEN WE WERE YOUNG AND UNAFRAID directed by Marie Byrd Sproul in her Keegan Theatre directing debut is nothing if not timely. The play is set on Whidbey Island off the cost of Washington State in 1972, but the remote location and blaring seventies music only highlights the eerie resonance of playwright Sarah Treem's work. In a time before battered women's shelters and legal recourse against male abusers, Agnes (Sheri S. Herren) runs a Bed and Breakfast with a basement entrance for victims of domestic abuse. Her most recent runaway, Mary Anne (Jenna Berk), arrives with an angry gash on her forehead and begins to shape the mind of Agnes' daughter Penny (Kaylynn Creighton) with her acquiescent and yet militantly tactical approach to dating. WHEN WE WERE YOUNG AND UNAFRAID does not deal in black and white: Treem's arguments are nuanced and delicately fashioned. Violence against women is at times as loud as the gash on Mary Anne's forehead and as quiet as Agnes' cheerful suggestion that her industrious daughter Penny ask a boy to the prom.