BWW Reviews: High School Students at Act Two @ Levine Tackle Jason Robert Brown's PARADE

Act Two @ Levine has provided Washington, DC area students of all experience levels opportunities to hone their musical theatre skills and, perhaps even more important, build valuable skills such as teamwork and hard work that can serve them well into adulthood. The longstanding musical training program at the community-based Levine School of Music, under the direction of Kevin Kuchar, has never shied away from giving its cast members an opportunity to take on the most challenging of musical theatre fare as a way to learn these valuable skills in a fun and hands-on way. Act Two's Pre-Professional Program - the audition-based intensive training program for high school students - has tackled, for instance, both Rent and Next to Normal in recent years alongside of several classics of the American musical theatre. This year, the pre-professional cast members are taking on Parade, Urinetown, and Spamalot - enormously popular shows, but still very ambitious.

This past weekend, the 38-member cast and crew for Parade thoroughly demonstrated the value of such a training program. Though - wisely - as an educational experience, the focus is on the process of putting on a full production rather than end result, I do have to say that the end result was a pretty fabulous one.

Parade may have had a short-lived Broadway run in 1998-1999, but it has not been forgotten. Patrons around the country - at professional regional theatres, community theatres, and schools - continue to be exposed to Jason Robert Brown's strong and varied Tony Award-winning score and Alfred Uhry's Tony Award-winning book. A subsequent successful and 'revised' take on the material at the Donmar Warehouse in London in 2007 - featuring new songs and new orchestrations for a smaller chamber-like orchestra - also perhaps renewed interest in the show.

The widespread inclusion of Parade in numerous theatres' seasons as of late has been both a blessing and a curse. If done well, Parade can be exhilarating to watch. However, if the material is not treated honestly and with integrity, the experience is not as powerful and can highlight some of the weaknesses. The story, after all, considers the plight of Leo Frank, a white Jewish man in Georgia who is accused of brutally killing Mary Phagan, a young girl who works in his factory, in the early 1900s. The investigation and trial, the subject of immense media scrutiny and strong public opinion, raises larger questions about how racial, regional, and religious prejudices play into how groups of people consider, internalize, and interpret the most tragic of human events.

No, it's not light fare, but all of the Act Two @ Levine cast members handled it beautifully and gave well-intentioned and thoughtful performances that defied their young ages under Kevin Kuchar's direction.

First and foremost was Eitan Mazia transcendent performance as Leo Frank. His beautifully trained voice - one of the strongest I've heard from a teenager - proved perfectly suited to "How Can I Call This Home?," his many duets with Audrey Rinehart (playing his wife, Lucille) such as "This is Not Over Yet" and "All the Wasted Time," as well as the tender, reflective, and heart-wrenching "Shm'a." This latter song - which Leo sings as he's subject to brutal and life-altering punishment - usually doesn't resonate with me even when sung by men who are of the age that Leo would have been. I typically don't find it believable, yet with Mazia's understated performance, I truly saw a man at peace with what was happening. It served as a nice contrast to the angry and agitated 'Leo' that we see through much of the show. Eitan, just as strong of an actor as he is singer, handled the emotional rollercoaster that Leo endures like a true professional.

As Leo's strong and determined wife Lucille, Audrey Rinehart was also inherently believable. Her emotional rendition of "You Don't Know This Man" proved to be one of the vocal highlights of the show as did the angry "Do it Alone." Unlike many young singers, the technique was equally matched with strong song interpretation choices in every case. Even when not singing, she had a quiet yet strong and natural presence about her that was very much appreciated. Together, Mazia and Rinehart had great chemistry with one another - a necessary ingredient for success in any production of Parade because of the heavy focus on how the husband and wife come closer together in the face of adversity.




Comment & Share




About Author

Subscribe to Author Alerts
Jennifer Perry Jennifer Perry is the Senior Contributing Editor for BroadwayWorld.Com's DC page. She has been a DC resident since 2001 having moved from Upstate New York to attend graduate school at American University's School of International Service. When not attending countless theatre, concert, and cabaret performances in the area and in New York, she works for the US Government as an analyst. Jennifer previously covered the DC performing arts scene for Maryland Theatre Guide, DC Metro Theater Arts, and DC Theatre Scene.


 
🔀WASHINGTON, DC SHOWS
In the Heights in Washington, DCIn the Heights
(Runs 5/1 - 5/3)
Monty Python's Spamalot
(Runs 5/1 - 5/3)
Camp David
(Runs 3/21 - 5/4)
Monty Python's Spamalot
(Runs 5/2 - 5/4)
The Addams Family
(Runs 5/1 - 5/4)
Monty Python's Spamalot
(Runs 5/1 - 5/4)
Camp David
(Runs 3/21 - 5/4)

More Shows | Add a Show

Message Board

BWW BLOGS