Evann Normandin

Evann Normandin Evann is an avid performer with a background in literature and dramaturgy, and she is excited to join the DC BroadwayWorld team! Evann graduated with a double major in Theatre and English and American Literatures from Middlebury College in January 2015, and an MSc in Literature and Modernity from the University of Edinburgh in November 2016.



MOST POPULAR ARTICLES
LAST 30 DAYS

BWW Review: VICU?A AND THE AMERICAN EPILOGUE at Mosaic Theater CompanyBWW Review: VICU?A AND THE AMERICAN EPILOGUE at Mosaic Theater Company
Posted: Nov. 9, 2017


LAST 365 DAYS

BWW Review: AIDA is a Visual and Auditory Sensation at The Kennedy CenterBWW Review: AIDA is a Visual and Auditory Sensation at The Kennedy Center
Posted: Sep. 11, 2017


BWW Review: AN OCTOROON is Anything But Black and White at Woolly Mammoth Theatre CompanyBWW Review: AN OCTOROON is Anything But Black and White at Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company
Posted: Jul. 23, 2017


BWW Review: BIG FISH is Larger Than Life at The Keegan TheatreBWW Review: BIG FISH is Larger Than Life at The Keegan Theatre
Posted: Aug. 10, 2017


BWW Review: REGINA SPEKTOR AND BEN FOLDS Dazzle Under the Stars at Wolf Trap Filene CenterBWW Review: REGINA SPEKTOR AND BEN FOLDS Dazzle Under the Stars at Wolf Trap Filene Center
Posted: Jul. 28, 2017


BWW Review: THE ARSONISTS is Incendiary at Woolly Mammoth Theatre CompanyBWW Review: THE ARSONISTS is Incendiary at Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company
Posted: Sep. 14, 2017


BWW Review: NIGHT SEASONS Embraces the Charmingly Quotidian at Quotidian Theatre CompanyBWW Review: NIGHT SEASONS Embraces the Charmingly Quotidian at Quotidian Theatre Company
Posted: Jul. 16, 2017


BWW Review: VICUŅA AND THE AMERICAN EPILOGUE at Mosaic Theater Company
November 9, 2017

Mosaic Theater Company's Production of Vicu a and the American Epilogue is in high demand and for good reason. If you're in DC and you meander to work every day in a cloud of existential dread wondering how we all got here and where our country could possibly be going, then I can't recommend this Trump-inspired satire highly enough. Written by Pulitzer Prize finalist John Robin Baitz (Other Desert Cities; Brothers and Sisters) and directed by Robert Eagan, this star-studded production has already been extended until December 3rd. Vicu a was originally produced to great critical acclaim during the 2016 election. The context of its incubation and inception is important, as at times the show feels disconnected from our current political reality. A new epilogue set 12 years in a dystopian future pulls the strands of past, present, and future together. It is sobering, eerie, and altogether necessary.

BWW Review: THE ARSONISTS is Incendiary at Woolly Mammoth Theatre CompanyBWW Review: THE ARSONISTS is Incendiary at Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company
September 14, 2017

Do you ever feel like we're all just sitting around watching the world burn? If you would like to do that in the presence of like-minded theatre goers, then head down to Woolly Mammoth and experience the sensation that is THE ARSONISTS. Written by Max Frisch in 1958 and commonly interpreted as a metaphor for the rise of Communism and Nazism, this new translation by Alistair Beaton directed by Michael John Garc s feels frighteningly contemporary.

BWW Review: WORD BECOMES FLESH Captivates at Theater AllianceBWW Review: WORD BECOMES FLESH Captivates at Theater Alliance
September 13, 2017

Back by popular demand (and just in time) WORD BECOMES FLESH is theatre worth doing more than thinking about. This encore presentation written by Marc Bamuthi Joseph with additional dramaturgical compositions by Khalil Anthony and Dahlak Brathwaite and directed by Psalmayene 24 is an arresting composition of dance, hip-hop, music, and spoken word performed by an indefatigable five man ensemble. Louis E. Davis, Chris Lane, Clayton Pelham Jr., Gary L. Perkins III, and Justin Weaks, with nary a weak link among them, move with one heartbeat as they perform a series of letters from a young black man to his unborn son and explore what it means to grow up black in the 21st century. Sneakers squeak, sweat drips, music blares, voices reverberate around every corner of the intimate theatre. It's clear a rebellion is taking shape.

BWW Review: AIDA is a Visual and Auditory Sensation at The Kennedy CenterBWW Review: AIDA is a Visual and Auditory Sensation at The Kennedy Center
September 11, 2017

Verdi's sumptuous epic AIDA graces the Kennedy Center for the first time in more than 25 years, and it is a knock-out. The three hour visual and auditory spectacle helmed by directorFrancesca Zambello and conductor Evan Rogisterwith original sketches and concept design by famed visual artist RETNA and choreography by one of contemporary dance's leading voices Jessica Lang is not to be missed. In her director's note, Francesca Zambello speaks to AIDA's appeal with opera lovers as part of the very "fabric of our beings", but you surely don't have to be a lover of opera to fall in love with this ensemble and creative team.

BWW Review: BIG FISH is Larger Than Life at The Keegan TheatreBWW Review: BIG FISH is Larger Than Life at The Keegan Theatre
August 10, 2017

BIG FISH fills every inch of the intimate Keegan Theatre and leaves more than a little magic in its wake. Based on the 1998 David Wallace novel and the 2003 Tim Burton film, BIG FISH revolves around traveling salesman Edward Bloom and the big stories he tells to his realist son Will. When Will finds out he's going to be father and must, at the same time, confront his father's mortality, he sets out to separate fact from fiction and find the man inside the behemoth.

BWW Review: REGINA SPEKTOR AND BEN FOLDS Dazzle Under the Stars at Wolf Trap Filene CenterBWW Review: REGINA SPEKTOR AND BEN FOLDS Dazzle Under the Stars at Wolf Trap Filene Center
July 28, 2017

A night of storytelling under the stars was just the way to celebrate a respite from this terrible heat wave. On Wednesday July 26th at 8 pm hundreds of fans, young and old, gathered at Wolf Trap Filene Center to watch master artists Regina Spektor and Ben Folds hit all the right notes.

BWW Review: AN OCTOROON is Anything But Black and White at Woolly Mammoth Theatre CompanyBWW Review: AN OCTOROON is Anything But Black and White at Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company
July 23, 2017

Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company's stunning remount of AN OCTOROON by Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, directed by Nataki Garrett reunites the principal cast and production teams from Woolly's sold out 2016 run. Boy, did I move to DC just in time. The Washington Post declares Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company "a national champion of the new-and frequently provocative-American play" and after laughing, crying, and thinking through Woolly's AN OCTOROON I would be hard pressed to find better descriptors. In the heart of the nation's capital, a stone's throw from The White House, AN OCTOROON is a living, breathing, vital dialogue about racial tension in America.

BWW Review: NIGHT SEASONS Embraces the Charmingly Quotidian at Quotidian Theatre CompanyBWW Review: NIGHT SEASONS Embraces the Charmingly Quotidian at Quotidian Theatre Company
July 16, 2017

Horton Foote's NIGHT SEASONS, directed by Jack Sbarbori at the Quotidian Theatre Company, examines the nature of a life defined by money and greed, and the notion that perhaps living is the greatest punishment of all. Foote, best known for his 1962 screenplay for To Kill a Mockingbird, delivers a quiet critique of capitalist culture and asks us to consider what "home" means. NIGHT SEASONS places us in Harrison Texas, 1963 on Josie Weems' (Jane Squier Bruns) 93rd birthday, though the play deals in flashbacks and the setting easily slips back and forth through 1923-1963 and the years in between. Josie Weems (Jane Squier Bruns) is the manipulative glue that holds the rambling Weems family together by subtly managing finances and allowing and prohibiting marriages at her discretion.

BWW Review: WHEN WE WERE YOUNG AND UNAFRAID Ignites Conversation at The Keegan TheatreBWW Review: WHEN WE WERE YOUNG AND UNAFRAID Ignites Conversation at The Keegan Theatre
June 30, 2017

The DC premiere of WHEN WE WERE YOUNG AND UNAFRAID directed by Marie Byrd Sproul in her Keegan Theatre directing debut is nothing if not timely. The play is set on Whidbey Island off the cost of Washington State in 1972, but the remote location and blaring seventies music only highlights the eerie resonance of playwright Sarah Treem's work. In a time before battered women's shelters and legal recourse against male abusers, Agnes (Sheri S. Herren) runs a Bed and Breakfast with a basement entrance for victims of domestic abuse. Her most recent runaway, Mary Anne (Jenna Berk), arrives with an angry gash on her forehead and begins to shape the mind of Agnes' daughter Penny (Kaylynn Creighton) with her acquiescent and yet militantly tactical approach to dating. WHEN WE WERE YOUNG AND UNAFRAID does not deal in black and white: Treem's arguments are nuanced and delicately fashioned. Violence against women is at times as loud as the gash on Mary Anne's forehead and as quiet as Agnes' cheerful suggestion that her industrious daughter Penny ask a boy to the prom.