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Catch These Reviews If You Can

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Catch These Reviews If You Can#1
Posted: 4/10/11 at 9:41pm
Catch These Reviews If You Can


The Hollywood Reporter:

'Catch Me if You Can'
by David Rooney

The super-slick new musical from the Hairspray team boasts superb craftsmanship, sophisticated design work, tuneful songs in a breezy range of ‘60s styles and a deluxe cast. So why does Catch Me If You Can stubbornly refuse to soar until it’s almost over?

The fault is not in the execution. Director Jack O’Brien’s staging and choreographer Jerry Mitchell’s tight, sexy dance routines practically hum with precision. The challenge is the source material itself.

Based on the 2002 Steven Spielberg movie, which starred Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hanks, the show chronicles the true adventures in crime of Frank Abagnale Jr. (Aaron Tveit). Before being captured in the mid-1960s while not yet 20, Frank had spent two years bouncing checks across the globe, passing himself off as a Pan Am pilot, a doctor and a lawyer. That makes him an elusive character, which is a great quality in a con man, but not always so great in a musical-theater protagonist, even if it did work for Harold Hill in The Music Man.

More than who or what Frank is, however, the problem is the way he’s presented. Late in the show, we come to see him as a lost boy, trying on multiple identities in an attempt to fill the void of his broken family. But such insight comes less through Frank himself than through Brenda (Kerry Butler), the young nurse with whom he falls in love in an underdeveloped romance. Her surging 11 o’clock number, “Fly, Fly Away,” packs more emotional charge than the rest of the show combined.

O’Brien and book writer Terrence McNally do a tidy job of conveying the shifting locations and compressing the cat-and-mouse story of Frank’s capers and his dogged pursuit by FBI agent Carl Hanratty (Norbert Leo Butz) into a brisk narrative. Their main expedient is Frank’s fantasy, upon being apprehended at Miami airport, of his life as a lavish TV variety spectacular. That framing device is fun, even if it’s one more element that distances us from the central character.

In hurtling from one snappy number to the next, O’Brien and McNally skim over the heart of the material, denying us a deeper connection to Frank. The IRS woes and money mismanagement of his father, Frank Sr. (Tom Wopat); the loss of their home; the infidelity of his French mother, Paula (Rachel de Benedet); his parents’ divorce and custody hearing; Frank Jr. running away at 16 – these formative episodes are all played for speed, not pathos. Frank is clearly a chip off the old block, but despite Wopat’s tender work, their bond doesn’t resonate until much later.

What we get is Frank’s restless adventure, without sharing the unhappiness that drives his escape. Just one reflective song might have fixed this. Instead, all the glossy musical numbers make his exploits a lark in which the audience has no stake. He jumps from success to success without suspense or tension because for too long, there’s no real threat of exposure. It may also undermine Frank’s hold on our affections that the first genuine showstopper goes to Hanratty, with Butz unleashing his inner Cab Calloway on the rousing “Don’t Break the Rules.”

Act I closes on “My Favorite Time of Year,” an intimate telephone duet in which the odd kinship between Frank and Carl is suggested. That poignancy is gradually amplified in the superior second act, when Frank finally unmasks something of himself in the penultimate number, “Good-Bye.” But it’s too little too late to make the show as satisfying as it might have been.

There’s nonetheless much to savor in a production polished to a high sheen. Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman again prove themselves an ace songwriting team. Their score evokes cocktail lounges, glitzy floorshows, Rat Pack suaveness, mellow jazz and energized go-go, all wrapped up in Shaiman and Larry Blank’s silky-smooth ‘60s-styled orchestrations. And Mitchell’s choreography puts a vigorous period-appropriate spin on every number.

David Rockwell’s sleek set is dominated by an onstage orchestra stand and cascading show curtains, enhanced by witty details to signal different locations. Costumer William Ivey Long dresses the performers sharply, and Kenneth Posner’s lighting expertly juggles Vegas flashiness with noirish shadows.

The cast is top-notch. In an understated turn, Wopat conveys the painful disappointment beneath Frank Sr.’s bravado, while de Benedet quietly suggests self-reproach even as her character disdains introspection. Linda Hart and Nick Wyman get comic mileage out of Brenda’s parents, and while Butler is under-utilized, she’s affecting in her limited stage time, making her one number count.

As Hanratty, Butz (a Tony winner for Dirty Rotten Scoundrels) does nuanced work balancing the jaded, paunchy slob with the wisecracking professional, driven in his quest to catch Frank yet plagued by the melancholy awareness that his job is his life. The boyishly handsome Tveit, who turned heads in Next to Normal, graduates to a lead role with sparkling self-assurance, strong pipes and natural charm. He makes it easy to like Frank, even if the show makes it hard to love him.

********************************************************************

The Faster Times:

'Catch Me if You Can'
by Jonathan Mandell

The con man sums up his story shortly after “Catch Me If You Can” begins: “I flew over five million miles as a Pan Am pilot, practiced medicine at a top Atlanta hospital, and worked as a prosecutor for the State of Louisiana” – all before the age of 21 and without having even graduated from high school. He also stole some two million dollars by forging checks, which got the F.B.I. on his trail, including an agent who became both his Javert and a father figure to him.

It is an incredible true story, but also a familiar one, told first by Frank Abagnale Jr. himself in a memoir, then by Steven Spielberg in a 2002 movie starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hanks. Now the team that turned “Hairspray” into a hit musical has brought “Catch Me If You Can” to Broadway, with a catchy original score, a bevy of beautiful broads (as Frank Sinatra might put it), much outsized talent, and a conceit from the “All That Jazz”/”Scottsboro Boys” playbook: Tell the story like a show. In this case, it is an early 1960’s TV variety hour. That is most clear when three leggy dames come out (in the manner of the old variety show commercials) dressed as a Swiss Army penknife, a jar of Higgins Original India Ink, and Elmer’s Glue – the tools of the forger’s trade.

There is much to like about this musical, and one reason above all to see it: the captivating performance of Norbert Leo Butz. There is also probable cause for disappointment.

Both the movie and the musical (on stage and in the program) make a point of establishing that in the ensuing years Abagnale has become a respectable citizen, a leading authority on fraud working for decades with the F.B.I., “married for over 34 years…the father of three sons,” the grandfather of three. But who are we kidding? Everybody secretly loves a good con artist (as long as they are not one of his victims), and the musical treats Abagnale’s brief, spectacular life of crime and impersonation with much the same glee as the film did. Indeed, the book, written by playwright Terrence McNally, follows closely the incidents presented in the first two-thirds of the movie, starting with Frank Jr.’s early knack for the casual con; transferring to a new school, he pretends for a week to be the substitute French teacher. Both the film and the musical imply that this penchant got out of hand because his parents broke up. Frank Jr. runs away and the
fun begins.

The gleefulness with which his escapades are chronicled is most embodied in the actor who plays Aaron Tveit, who debuted on Broadway five years ago as the smooth-talking DJ Link Larkin in “Hairspray” and then replaced Norbert Leo Butz as Fiyero in “Wicked,” but is best-known among theatergoers as the fantasized son in “Next to Normal.” Having demonstrated his talent for singing and dancing, he established his sly dreamboat status among the tween demographic in TV appearances as Nate’s older cousin Trip in “Gossip Girl” and Ugly Betty’s one-episode boyfriend. (This may help explain why Tveit several times goes shirtless in the new musical.)

When the opportunity for a new con arrives, the lighting changes, and Tveit as Frank Jr. looks at the audience as if to say “What luck!” – the exact same staging occurs with Daniel Radcliffe’s more legal con artist in the current revival of “How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying,” which is a useful point of comparison: Tveit is frankly more effective as Frank Jr. than Radcliffe is as Finch. Yet, he can also put away his mischievous grin, and reveal that he’s a kid, almost a “Leave It To Beaver” innocent eager for approval.

It should take nothing from this buff and winning performer, sure to be leading man material for decades to come, that the real star of “Catch Me As He Can” turns out to be a middle-aged guy with a receding hairline and a noticeable paunch. The paunch is actually fake, a fat suit. Still, in an earlier era, Norbert Leo Butz surely would have changed his name to something like Bert Lee. Many of Butz’s previous roles, all well-regarded, were themselves of con men, including the lead in “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” and as CEO Jeffrey Skilling in “Enron.” But it is as the dumpy, disheveled chaser of con men Agent Carl Hanratty that Butz all but takes over the stage, in such numbers as the down-and-dirty (and amusing) “Don’t Break The Rules,” his dancing a lesson in comic grace, his voice in overwhelming good form.

Each of the other main characters also gets at least one number that also shows them to good effect – Tom Wopat (best-known still for “The Dukes of Hazzard” despite years on Broadway) as Frank Sr., Rachel de Benedet as Frank’s mother Paula, Kerry Butler (Xanadu, Hairspray) as Brenda Strong, the girl Frank Jr. wants to marry – and the reason why he finally gets caught.

They, and the ensemble, sing 17 original songs by Marc Shaiman and Scott Whitman, offering a variety of styles (keeping with the variety show conceit), mostly from the 1960’s, the period in which the events take place, especially swinging jazz, but also ballads and ballroom and generic pop, all put together with Jerry Mitchell’s energetic choreography and Jack O’Brien’s direction.

Yet for all its many charms, “Catch Me If You Can” is not the thorough thrill that one might have hoped. The creators truncate the story as presented in the film. They keep probably the most memorable image in the film – DiCaprio escaping detection at the airport surrounded by beautiful women in Pan Am stewardess outfits — but make it part of a production number without the context or the suspense…the very things that held our interest in the film. To fill the more than two hour running time, they jazz up the show for the stage with several numbers that look like slightly raunchier versions of the dances in “The Jackie Gleason Show,” the most successful of which is “Doctor’s Orders.” We even get a Mitch Miller spoof. None of this seems all that connected to the campy style of the team’s previous big success, “Hairspray,” despite similarity in era and setting. The variety hour content starts feeling static, something less than
varied.

The set, designed by David Rockwell (Hairspray), at first works fine. There is a 60’s style white lattice bandstand on which the orchestra sits, and it is used with some cleverness — as the side of a pool, as a hotel wall, as foundation for a podium, etc.– and, of course above all, as the set of a TV variety show. But the white-latticed wall starts to feel monotonous. Perhaps the set is a metaphor for the musical as a whole. This latest foray into the “Mad Men” era, as busy with talent as it is, begins to feel repetitive.

Crime did pay for Frank Abagnale, Jr., although he served time in prison. The question for theatergoers now is whether his crimes will play.
Updated On: 4/10/11 at 09:41 PM
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Catch These Reviews If You Can#2
Posted: 4/10/11 at 9:44pm
Catch These Reviews If You Can


The Chicago Tribune:

'Adaptation could've stuck more closely to the script'
by Chris Jones

The key to turning "Catch Me If You Can" into a Broadway musical was within the very title of the 2002 Steven Spielberg movie that served as the source. It encapsulates the thrill of the chase, a quality sadly lacking in the show that opened Sunday night at the Neil Simon Theatre. And it conveys the slippery charm of the lovable trickster rogue -- in this case, Frank Abagnale Jr., the youthful master forger of those predigital swinging '60s, a guy who fooled banks and airlines but was eventually brought down by his own need for love.

Given the appeal of that narrative, and the existence of a deeper plot involving young Frank's search for a father figure and the complex relationship he forges with the paternalistic FBI agent trying to do the catching, "Catch Me If You Can" really should have made a great musical, especially given the talents involved in its conversion. But the show had to have more trust in the story.

As that film (which starred Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hanks) well understood, but the musical struggles to convey, we don't want to see Frank get caught. We actually like living vicariously as a lawyer, doctor or Pan Am pilot. We love seeing Frank take down the power brokers and wriggling away, every time. But in this show -- with a book by Terrence McNally, music by Marc Shaiman and lyrics by Shaiman and Scott Wittman -- Frank (Aaron Tveit) decides in the first scene, which is really the last scene of his capture, that he wants to be the subject of his own variety show, which then appears around him and functions as an outer frame for one big flashback.

It's not so much that this show-within-a-show conceit fundamentally torpedoes the enterprise, although it certainly leads this musical down a derivative path that recalls moments in both "Chicago" and "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying." It also creates a culture of faux-Brechtian artifice that both kills moment-by-moment suspense and prevents the audience from being drawn into Frank's confidence in real time. One understands that this was doubtless an honorable attempt to convey theatricality, as distinct from merely sticking the movie on the stage. That's fair enough. And it's true that Jack O'Brien's production finds more of a workable style in the vastly superior second act of a show that starts out disastrously and never fully recovers -- despite great lyrical wit, a plethora of theatrical ideas and a very rich and truthful performance from Norbert Leo Butz as the tortoise-like G-man racing against a much younger hare. But as
choreographed in outre and overtly burlesque style by Jerry Mitchell that theatricality often verges on high camp, as when leggy chorus ladies emerge dressed as bottles of glue and ink, staples of Frank's check-forging trade.

Given the way that style, racy and uninhibited though it may be, pervades so much of O'Brien's production, it makes it much harder to buy in emotionally to the themes that the musical brings up more successfully in Act 2. Frankly, the show gets caught between worlds. It doesn't want to fully embrace the caustic "Chicago"-style edge -- aside from Mitchell's choreographic pastiche, Shaiman's varied score has a typically romantic heart, and the lead actor, Tveit, is more rooted in sweetness and charm than edge. The show also has a powerful and very traditional 11 o'clock number for Kerry Butler, who plays Frank's eventual love, nurse Brenda Strong. But Butler's vocal emotions, rich and strong as they surely feel in this terrific Shaiman melody, "Fly, Fly Away," seem as curiously out of place as her uncertain performance, mostly because we never see the two youngsters actually falling in love.

In a movie, that can done with a glance. But it needs real care and attention on the Broadway stage. And like many prior stage adaptations of movies, "Catch Me" fundamentally struggles with how to stage more plot than time and space allows. Aside from the lack of tension and, in the first act, energy, the other major problem here is that the on-stage big band suggests a very different era -- you are put in mind of a 1940s cruise ship or Cole Porter musical -- from the era of Frank's actual antics in the early 1960s. This yet further removes the audience from the actual story. And if you don't much care about the fate of the protagonist, as you do not here despite Tveit's definite charms, then neither the catching nor the escaping is all it could be.

The piece certainly has its enjoyments: Tveit has an extraordinarily beautiful voice; Butz's craftful, big-hearted and wholly unpredictable acting is frequently fascinating to watch (his character emerges as the most powerfully wrought); Tom Wopat, as Frank's real father, has an interesting sadness; and the show, which features a set by David Rockwell, has a certain visual pop, even though the design is surely hampered by all those on-stage musicians. But "Catch Me," alas, didn't fully catch me. Frank slipped off into the night, and I don't feel as if I found him.


*************************************************************************

amNewYork:

'Catch Me if You Can'
by Matt Windman

** (out of four)

"Catch Me If You Can," the eagerly anticipated Broadway musical based on the breezy 2002 Leonardo DiCaprio film, is a product of essentially the same creative team behind the mega-hit "Hairspray." It's even playing in the same theater as "Hairspray" and shares an early 1960s setting.

But in spite of so much promise, "Catch Me If You Can" is so disappointing that it will leave you wishing you could travel back in time and watch "Hairspray" again.

As in the film, teenager Frank Abagnale Jr. (Aaron Tveit) escapes from suburbia, financing himself by writing bad checks. Meanwhile, determined FBI agent Carl Hanratty (Norbert Leo Butz) chases Abagnale around the country.

Frank manages to pass himself off as a pilot, doctor and lawyer. But his jet-setting lifestyle hits a speed bump when he becomes engaged to a nurse and tries to settle down.

The writers make the corny choice of framing the show as a confessional flashback. It begins with the FBI capturing Frank, who then proceeds to narrate his story to the audience, treating it as if it were a television variety show. This results in choppy storytelling that trades the film's fun for never-ending exposition.

The score has a swinging '60s flavor but is irritating and devoid of melody. On a similar note, Jerry Mitchell's go-go choreography is energetic but generic.

The modelesque Tveit, who carries the entire show on his shoulders, should be praised for his sheer physical stamina and chameleon-like ability to pull off Frank's disguises. However, his performance is inferior to the dark and thrilling one he gave in "Next to Normal."

Butz and Butler, both major Broadway talents, suffer from their poor material. Only Tom Wopat manages to make a strong impression as Frank's father, who slowly disintegrates into a drunken and broken man. The chorus of leggy showgirls also makes for nice eye candy.


Updated On: 4/10/11 at 09:44 PM
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Catch These Reviews If You Can#2
Posted: 4/11/11 at 5:31am
For me the show basically has two major problems:
1. The story is just not interesting enough.
2. The music is boring in the extreme.

If it were not for Norbert and Aaron's performances I don't think I could have stuck it through to the end.
THEATRE 2019: ASPECTS OF LOVE**** FRANKENSTEIN (Paris)**** AN ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE**** COMPANY***** [title of show]**** CAN CAN*** THE CEREAL CAFE**** BAD GIRLS**** RAGS***** LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE***** FOLLIES***** ROMANCE ROMANCE**** THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES*** LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE***** QUEEN OF THE MIST**** SIX** THE PRICE***** MAGGIE MAY **** CALENDAR GIRLS** MAN OF LA MANCHA**** WAITRESS***** FANNY AND STELLA***
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Catch These Reviews If You Can#3
Posted: 4/11/11 at 7:53am
Ive only seen the Out of Rown but i loved it. I actually really liked the music but i love that style of music anyway, i thought it was witty and had a great knowing nod and wink to classics from that era.

I also really like the story though i think it lacked some moments that could have drawn us in a bit more.
Namo i love u but we get it already....you don't like Madonna
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Catch These Reviews If You Can#4
Posted: 4/11/11 at 11:54am
been over to the Broadway board and stolen all their quotes, the show was pretty much on the money on what I said, you couldn't love it, but wasn't a dogs dinner.

Chicago Tribune is mixed-negative.
"The piece certainly has its enjoyments: Tveit has an extraordinarily beautiful voice; Butz's craftful, big-hearted and wholly unpredictable acting is frequently fascinating to watch (his character emerges as the most powerfully wrought); Tom Wopat, as Frank's real father, has an interesting sadness; and the show, which features a set by David Rockwell, has a certain visual pop, even though the design is surely hampered by all those on-stage musicians. But "Catch Me," alas, didn't fully catch me. Frank slipped off into the night, and I don't feel as if I found him."

http://leisureblogs.chicagotribune.com/the_theater_loop/2011/04/catch-me-if-you-can-on-broadway-adaptation-couldve-stuck-more-closely-to-the-script.html

TALKIN'BROADWAY is negative.
http://www.talkinbroadway.com/world/index.html

The Faster Times - Mixed to Positive
"Yet for all its many charms, “Catch Me If You Can” is not the thorough thrill that one might have hoped. The creators truncate the story as presented in the film. They keep probably the most memorable image in the film – DiCaprio escaping detection at the airport surrounded by beautiful women in Pan Am stewardess outfits — but make it part of a production number without the context or the suspense…the very things that held our interest in the film."

http://thefastertimes.com/newyorktheater/2011/04/10/catch-me-if-you-can-review/

The Hollywood Reporter - Mixed
"The super-slick new musical from the Hairspray team boasts superb craftsmanship, sophisticated design work, tuneful songs in a breezy range of ‘60s styles and a deluxe cast. So why does Catch Me If You Can stubbornly refuse to soar until it’s almost over?"

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/catch-me-you-can-theater-176795

Newsday - Pretty Negative
News that the guys from "Hairspray" and "Dirty Rotten Scoundrels" were making a musical based on the movie "Catch Me If You Can" raised a couple of intriguing -- also daunting -- questions. How? And why?

That is, how could songs, dances and a Broadway stage add to the plot-heavy adventures of a real-life teen con man without losing the odd and breezy travelogue style of Steven Spielberg's 2002 film starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hanks? This is answered, sort of, by framing the kid's life as flashbacks on his own '60s TV variety show.

OK, then, why? Hard to guess, alas. Director Jack O'Brien, writer Terrence McNally, composer Marc Shaiman and co-lyricist Scott Wittman have made a slick, professional, conscientious and uninspired show that strains to fit Frank Abagnale Jr.'s improbably true tale into a stylized box of sentimentality and ho-hum retro-routines.

http://www.newsday.com/entertainment/theater/catch-me-fumbles-at-neil-simon-theatre-1.2811158

Associated Press - VERY negative
"Played by Leonardo DiCaprio in the film, this time the role of Frank Abagnale Jr. has been handed over to Aaron Tveit. As pretty as a Ken doll and blessed with a wonderful voice, Tveit nevertheless struggles to convey genuineness"

http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=13344305&page=1

Variety is fairly mixed
“That musical sound and the perfs from Butz and Tveit (with assists from the briefly seen Butler and Hart) offer considerable entertainment value. Sadly, though, this “Catch” of the day is not especially compelling.”

http://www.variety.com/review/VE1117945004

New York Times - Mixed

Created by much of the team that gave us the long-running Broadway hit “Hairspray” — including the songwriters Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman, the choreographer Jerry Mitchell and the director Jack O’Brien — “Catch Me if You Can” has been constructed with such care that you imagine its transparent blueprint looming between you and the stage. Though the real-life story that inspired this show (and the 2002 movie of the same title) is full of elaborate deceptions and corkscrew twists, you will never at any point be confused by its theatrical incarnation.

Or roused or touched or more than mildly entertained, for about 90 percent of the time. (There is one wow of an exception, a first-act production number led by Norbert Leo Butz.) In the season of the incomprehensible, out-of-control “Spider-Man,” I suppose one should give extra points to a show that is so tidy and utterly of a piece. But a tale that follows a continent-spanning pursuit of a chameleon criminal should have, above all things, momentum. And “Catch Me” mostly just seems to stand in one place, explaining itself."

Read more: https://www.broadwayworld.com/board/readmessage.php?page=3&thread=1030430&boardid=1#ixzz1JELI4Bxk

http://theater.nytimes.com/2011/04/11/theater/reviews/catch-me-if-you-can-at-neil-simon-theater-review.html

B- from Entertainment Weekly
Entertainment Weekly once again praised the cast, but didn't think the show was perfect.

"Tveit seems perfectly suited to playing Frank Abagnale Jr., who drops out of high school to pursue improbable consecutive careers as a check forger, Pan Am pilot, pediatrician, and assistant district attorney. In the Tom Hanks role of the FBI agent pursuing Abagnale, Norbert Leo Butz seems an appropriately schlumpy bureaucrat. Butz, who won a Tony for playing a small-time swindler himself in 2005's Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, gets a first-act song-and-dance showstopper, 'Don't Break the Rules' — and then mostly recedes into the background."

The show's love interest (the Amy Adams role from the film) is also generally MIA until rather late in the show, though she's occasionally trotted out as foreshadowing in the first act. It's another bit of misdirection, but a smart one because it gives the adorable Kerry Butler a little more stage time. When she finally appears as nurse Brenda, Butler delivers one of the show's most memorable tunes, the lovely ballad 'Fly, Fly Away.'

http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,20364394_20480885,00.html

USA Today is fairly mixed
"Still, in failing to deliver a youthful protagonist you can really cheer for, this Catch Me If You Can may leave you feeling a bit cheated."

"But that charm wears thin over 2½ hours in which Frank Jr. and his exploits are so dominant. The musical is structured so that we see our mischievous finagler crafting his own story, introducing some numbers and then literally trying to sing and dance his way out of trouble. It's a canny conceit, but one that only emphasizes the character's disingenuousness.

Norbert Leo Butz is predictably marvelous as Carl Hanratty, the schlumpy federal agent who stalks and eventually nails the underage schemer — though not as handily as Butz walks away with the show.

Butz imbues Carl (played by Tom Hanks in the film) with wry humor and bittersweet humanity. It's no accident that Tveit's Frank Jr. is more sympathetic in his scenes with Carl, who emerges both as a father figure and a fellow lonely soul.

Butz also handles the musical numbers with an ease that often trumps Tveit's more aggressive virtuosity. Certainly, Butz is more adept at milking Shaiman's jazzy nuances, which nod tothe more sophisticated side of '60s pop culture, from James Bond to Sinatra"

http://www.usatoday.com/life/theater/reviews/2011-04-11-catchme11_ST_N.htm

Bloomberg - Mixed
"David Rockwell’s endearingly suggestive Swinging 60s sets, lit with jewel-like resplendence by Kenneth Posner, give us lots to ogle besides the girls and boys kicking, tapping and swirling about the stage. But really? They’re the main event."

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-04-11/high-spirits-higher-legs-launch-catch-me-if-you-can-review.html










Updated On: 4/11/11 at 11:54 AM
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Catch These Reviews If You Can#5
Posted: 4/11/11 at 5:49pm
SADM - I love that "style" of music too. But the songs were just so bloody tuneless! lol
THEATRE 2019: ASPECTS OF LOVE**** FRANKENSTEIN (Paris)**** AN ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE**** COMPANY***** [title of show]**** CAN CAN*** THE CEREAL CAFE**** BAD GIRLS**** RAGS***** LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE***** FOLLIES***** ROMANCE ROMANCE**** THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES*** LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE***** QUEEN OF THE MIST**** SIX** THE PRICE***** MAGGIE MAY **** CALENDAR GIRLS** MAN OF LA MANCHA**** WAITRESS***** FANNY AND STELLA***
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Catch These Reviews If You Can#6
Posted: 4/12/11 at 5:46am
I'm with you SADM, I loved it!!!! Brilliant night out!
Bob, you must have had a bad night!
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Catch These Reviews If You Can#7
Posted: 4/12/11 at 6:03am
Yeah, I had a bad night - suffering through that crap lol. The worst show I've seen so far in 2011 by a mile. I really did find it mindnumbingly boring. (But then I found the Hairspray score mindnumbingly boring too and I know you loved that lol.) Just way too bland for my tastes.
THEATRE 2019: ASPECTS OF LOVE**** FRANKENSTEIN (Paris)**** AN ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE**** COMPANY***** [title of show]**** CAN CAN*** THE CEREAL CAFE**** BAD GIRLS**** RAGS***** LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE***** FOLLIES***** ROMANCE ROMANCE**** THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES*** LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE***** QUEEN OF THE MIST**** SIX** THE PRICE***** MAGGIE MAY **** CALENDAR GIRLS** MAN OF LA MANCHA**** WAITRESS***** FANNY AND STELLA***
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Catch These Reviews If You Can#8
Posted: 4/12/11 at 2:34pm
I also found it incredibly boring!! And the songs were so tuneless. Forgotten most of it now especially since I saw How To Succeed and Book of Mormon either side of it.