2
Page: 2


Glick in Little Shop

Falsettolands
Chorus Member
joined:11/18/13
Chorus Member
joined:
11/18/13
Glick in Little Shop#26
Posted: 11/14/19 at 1:38pm

I will say, despite the mixed opinions on Blanchard's interpretation of the role (I rather liked it; Green was never really that strong a singer, but she made up for it in a truly unique characterization) this is the first time I've ever seen someone take the line "learn how to be more the girl that's inside me" so literally. Like, that was a flip switch moment for her Audrey and it propelled her in a different direction for the rest of the show. An interesting take.

clever2 Profile Photoclever2 Profile Photo
clever2
Understudy
joined:5/19/19
Understudy
joined:
5/19/19
Glick in Little Shop#27
Posted: 11/15/19 at 3:35pm
I saw Groff last month. Very professional, locked down performance, which means he was good if rather robotic. And then there was all the spitting, which is absolutely ridiculous.

Last night, I saw Gideon Glick, who did not spit and whose Seymour was fresh and every moment felt like it was happening for the first time. His long, lean physicality is definitely a major advantage. Entire jokes were told simply by how he positioned his body. Not a drop of his performance emulated Groff’s outside of blocking, and I spent the entire evening caring about Seymour.

Groff’s take on it is sweet guy gradually becomes evil the deeper into this he gets. He ultimately regains his goodness again but it’s far too late, and there’s a lot of darkness in that performance. And you know what? That worked great. What also works is being on Seymour’s side throughout the show, without question, and that’s the interpretation Gideon has provided. With his geektastic adorability factor and rubbery frame, Gideon LOOKS like Seymour. And his singing was by no means a choir of angels but it was honest and beautifully acted.

While I found there to be no chemistry between Groff and Tammy, Gideon and Tammy have it in abundance and their moments together are bursting with energy. It’s obvious they’re having an absolute blast together, and this element made the show so much more effective.

I have no idea why people aren’t understanding that Tammy’s Audrey is beaten down, world weary, with a tough exterior and she’s exhausted. She doesn’t appear to be on drugs or drunk. She appears exhausted. She’s literally getting beaten up every night. That’s not even my interpretation. It’s made clear in the book several times that she’s literally getting beaten up every night. Ellen Greene, God love her, made the abuse whimsical. Tammy is making it real. She’s giving the production a much needed anchor and it’s beautiful, heartbreaking, and she acts the hell out of those songs.

Different Seymours, different shows. Grateful I got to see both.
nasty_khakis
Broadway Legend
joined:3/15/07
Broadway Legend
joined:
3/15/07
Glick in Little Shop#28
Posted: 11/15/19 at 3:47pm

I saw it last night as well and agree Gideon is near perfect. He was able to be so sincere yet so funny while still playing a completely broken person. For the first time in my long life in listening to and seeing this show (and movie) I understood what the song "Skid Row" is about. I've always seen it as a mood song, funnily setting the scene of the show, but Gideon's singing it (and I think it's at a slower tempo than usual) really dug into me how badly he wants out. How he'll do anything to escape. I got serious chills I didn't get with Groff's "nice guy" portrayal. 

I agree he has more chemistry with Blanchard, but she's 100% playing drunk mixed with the weariness you're saying. I think Mayer is trying to say something about the powers of addiction in all forms, drugs, abuse, and fame. Gideon's Seymore is the product of being essentially abused by Mushnik for years and years and it mirrors Audrey's abuse at the hands of men for years. 

This also isn't in the actual production so don't misread but there were moments in Gideon's performance where I realized this plant's talking might not even be real and is just a figment of Seymore's abused brain thinking this is what he has to do to get out of his situation. He's killing people standing in HIS way of getting out of Skid Row. Again, this isn't in Mayer's production directly but I definitely thought this more than once because of Gideon's almost sinister looks sometimes. He's definitely more emotionally unstable than any Seymore I've seen before. 

clever2 Profile Photoclever2 Profile Photo
clever2
Understudy
joined:5/19/19
Understudy
joined:
5/19/19
Glick in Little Shop#29
Posted: 11/15/19 at 3:58pm

nasty_khakis said: "I agree he has more chemistry with Blanchard, but she's 100% playing drunk mixed with the weariness you're saying. I think Mayer is trying to say something about the powers of addiction in all forms, drugs, abuse, and fame. Gideon's Seymore is the product of being essentially abused by Mushnik for years and years and it mirrors Audrey's abuse at the hands of men for years.”


I can work with that.

 

Rosette3
Understudy
joined:3/17/19
Understudy
joined:
3/17/19
Glick in Little Shop#30
Posted: 11/17/19 at 9:57pm

I saw the Sat 11/17 evening show. I've only seen a production of LSOH once prior which made me fall in love with the musical and it was such a treat to see a production with this caliber of talent. Gideon really fit the role of Seymour from his nerdy but adorable demeanor to his lanky frame. One of my top moments of his was in Feed Me. I've always associated Gideon to have a soft angelic/innocent leaning voice, so it was a very pleasant surprise to see another side when he let it rip for the first time in Seymour's soulful break in Feed Me. The second was that his dancing was so awkward yet entertaining it just fit in perfectly. I don't know if his dance skills are just that bad/nerdy looking in real life but it worked really well for Seymour. Regardless, you could tell he was letting loose, dancing unabashedly full out that you almost forgot how ridiculous/smile-through-your-teeth cringeworthy it felt which was pretty effective for the character. 

As much I enjoyed his musical performance in LSOH, his acting was so much more captivating over his vocals (relatively speaking), it left me almost wishing we could trade out songs in exchange to get treated more stage time with his spoken dialogue. I'm grateful to have seen his portrayal of Seymour (along with Dill in TKAM) and look forward to following his career and hope for another role soon.

Updated On: 11/18/19 at 09:57 PM

2