BWW Review: A Young Man's Brain is our Stage in THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME

BWW Review: A Young Man's Brain is our Stage in THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIMEMark Haddon's acclaimed novel, "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time", captures the perspective of a young man with a mind so great that he struggles to fit into the everyday world. This uniquely written book translates seamlessly to the stage in the Tony Award-winning Best Play. For two hours and thirty minutes, audiences are swept into the life of Christopher Boone and taken on a murder-mystery adventure to solve the peculiar killing of a neighborhood dog. Using technology that plays to the audience's senses, this hailed production is certain to stand the test of time.

Christopher's journey is told to us through three main voices: First, the voice of his mentor and the play's narrator, portrayed by Maria Elena Ramirez. Second, an intimate ensemble that rotates characters (and, impressively, acts as the very set itself). Third, and most importantly, Christopher himself. Together, these voices create a well-choreographed, well-communicated story that lets us understand exactly what this protagonist is thinking and feeling. BWW Review: A Young Man's Brain is our Stage in THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME

Paired with a stage that emits lights, sounds, and graphics (which is only fitting -- Christopher loves computers and technology), Curious Incident becomes a powerful experience that puts audiences in the shoes of someone who--on the outside--is deeply misunderstood. That alone is pretty powerful.

Playing Christopher (at select performances) is Adam Langdon, who likely has one of the most difficult roles in theater. Though never explicitly said, it's clear Christopher lies on the autism spectrum, and Langdon encompasses what we might see in one individual's struggle to communicate, as well as a display of astounding intelligence. Ultimately, it's his performance that carries the show.

Curious Incident shies away from the glitz and glamour of a traditional Broadway show, and instead provides wit, humor, raw emotion and a moving look into one person's unique world. It hits the mark of good theater and leaves you thinking on the way out.


See The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time at the Oriental Theatre in Chicago until December 24th. For more information, visit www.broadwayinchicago.com.


Photo Credit: Joan Marcus

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