HBO to Debut Documentary ABORTION: STORIES WOMEN TELL, 4/3

HBO to Debut Documentary ABORTION: STORIES WOMEN TELL, 4/3

HBO to Debut Documentary ABORTION: STORIES WOMEN TELL, 4/3

Although 44 years have passed since the U.S. Supreme Court decision inRoe v. Wade recognized a woman's right to choose, abortion remains one of the most polarizing issues in America. Since 2011, more than half of the states have imposed significant restrictions on abortion, including in Missouri, where only one abortion clinic remains open in the entire state, and patients and their doctors must navigate a 72-hour waiting period.

ABORTION: STORIES WOMEN TELL offers an intimate window into the lives of women living in Missouri. Tracy Droz Tragos (winner of the Sundance Film Festival Grand Jury Prize for U.S. Documentary for "Rich Hill"), a native of the state, sheds new light on the issue, focusing not on the debate, which is typically dominated by legislators and advocates, but on women's personal stories. Presenting a candid dialogue about one of the most divisive and timely issues facing America today, the film debuts MONDAY, APRIL 3 (8:00-9:35 p.m. ET/PT) on HBO.

The documentary will also be available on HBO NOW, HBO GO, HBO On Demand and affiliate portals.

Wherever they stand the issue, the women in the film base their choices on individual circumstances and beliefs. ABORTION: STORIES WOMEN TELL underscores their strength and capacity to overcome and persevere through complicated and unexpected circumstances.

As a result of the state's restrictions and the availability of just one operating clinic, many women in Missouri travel across the state line, to Hope Clinic for Women in Granite City, Ill., just 15 minutes from downtown St. Louis, but more than 100 miles from rural Missouri. Drawing on access to the clinic, the film features interviews with a range of women of all ages, backgrounds and faiths, as well as doctors, nurses and staff who face protestors on a daily basis, and activists on both sides, hoping to sway decisions and lives.

The film provides a balanced looks at abortion through women's own words and experiences. Among the subjects:

Amie, a 30-year-old single mom who splits custody of her two children with her ex and works 70 hours a week as a waitress and bartender to make ends meet. She drives 400 miles round-trip to get to Hope Clinic, where she's given a prescription for an abortion pill. Crying, Amie thinks of her kids and says, "I'm not just doing this for me."

Chi Chi, a guard at Hope Clinic, who shields women daily from the anti-choice protesters in the clinic's parking lot. Challenging a particularly vocal protestor, Chi Chi demands, "Are you gonna take care of these babies?" Reflecting on her own abortion years ago - her son was only six months old at the time - Chi Chi says it was the right decision because she didn't want to end up on public assistance.