BWW Review: Wagner's HOLLANDER Flies Under Nezet-Seguin, with Volle and Wagner, at the Met

BWW Review: Wagner's HOLLANDER Flies Under Nezet-Seguin, with Volle and Wagner, at the Met
Michael Volle and Amber Wagner. Photo:
Richard Termine/Metropolitan Opera

The audience was there to be thrilled on Tuesday, when the Met's new Music Director, Yannick Nezet-Seguin, took on Wagner's early masterwork, DER FLIEGENDE HOLLANDER (THE FLYING DUTCHMAN)--his first opera by the composer in the house--and they weren't disappointed. It was a musically glorious performance that flew by (no mean trick at almost 2 ½ hours without intermission). The Met orchestra was in peak form under its new maestro, the company's great chorus was both charming and energetic, and the cast of principals was marvelous, led by baritone Michael Volle in the title role and soprano Amber Wagner as Senta.

BWW Review: Wagner's HOLLANDER Flies Under Nezet-Seguin, with Volle and Wagner, at the Met
Yannick Nezet-Seguin. Photo:
Richard Termine/Metropolitan Opera

This tale of a mysterious sea captain, cursed to sail the seas unless he can find a woman's faithful love, may be Wagner's most accessible tale, unwinding in a continuous stream of music that is tense but never overwrought. In the conductor's thoughtful performance, this meant that even when the curtain fell for a scene change after Acts I and II, the music kept flowing, naturally, leaving no chance for the audience to grow restless and distracted. (The Met's audience is known for both during pauses without music.)

Volle, in his black coat and icy demeanor, was enough to drive fear into the heart of anyone--except those who came for powerful singing. From his introductory monologue all the way through to his departure, letting Senta off the hook, though he (wrongly) thought her less than true to him, the baritone sounded dark, rich and thrilling. His character may have been cursed to sail the seas, but Volle was blessed with a voice that makes glorious music.

Senta is no Valkyrie but simply a sea-captain's daughter who has a yen for the mythological Dutchman, and Wagner (the singer), kept the reins on her substantial voice until it was called for. She's been at the Met for a while, but they seem to have been waiting for just the right role to showcase her talents. They found it in Senta. She took a bit to warm up, but when she did, there was no stopping her, bursting forth with a huge sound the color of her name: amber. Her aria, giving her own take on the Dutchman's story, was rich and quite moving. And she was game for her suicidal leap at the opera's end, to prove her love even after the Dutchman departs without her.

Related



More From This Author

Richard Sasanow Richard Sasanow is a long-time writer on art, music, food, travel and international business for publications including The New York Times, The Guardian (UK), Town & Country and Travel & Leisure, among many others. He also interviewed some of the great singers of the 20th century for the programs at the San Francisco Opera and San Diego Opera and worked on US tours of the Orchestre National de France and Vienna State Opera, conducted by Lorin Maazel, Zubin Mehta and Leonard Bernstein.