Amore Opera Presents OLIVO E PASQUALE and DON PASQUALE Double Bill, 10/19-11/4

Related: Amore Opera, Don Pasquale, Olivo E Pasquale, Gaetano Donizetti, Nathan Hull


This Fall, Amore Opera presents the unprecedented double bill of Don Pasquale and the American premiere of Olivo e Pasquale, presented as The Pasquale Saga. Though both comedies are composed by Gaetano Donizetti and with title characters of the same name, these two operas were originally unrelated. However, as presented and conceived by Amore Opera's Artistic Director, Nathan Hull, the two plots are interwoven, such that "Olivo e Pasquale" is presented as a prequel to the more familiar opera, and the two Pasquale characters are now one and the same. The action of the two comic operas has been set in early 1800's Sicily, and Don Pasquale has been merrily re-imagined as a crime boss.

Olivo e Pasquale: Don Olivo is a quick-tempered head of a crime family, operating undercover as an olive oil exporter. He is constantly at odds with his younger brother Pasquale, whose benevolence and humanity prove frustrating to Olivo's underhanded plots. Olivo plans to marry off his daughter Isabella, to a wealthy importer/smuggler Le Bross, much to her displeasure. She has fallen in love with the firm's meek accountant Camillo. The Don's stubborn disregard for his daughter's feelings is pitied by everyone (including Le Bross!), and they soon begin plotting against Don Olivo to aid Isabella. The Don's fiery will is well matched by that of his spirited and clever daughter, and the resulting mayhem is uproariously entertaining!

Don Pasquale: Several years have passed and Pasquale has become the head of the family. The aging Don Pasquale is planning a marriage for his nephew Ernesto. However, Ernesto, in love with the young widow Norina, rejects the bride of his uncle's choosing, and is thus disinherited. Determined to produce a new heir to his fortune, and to secure the future of the (ahem) "family business," the Don decides to find his own young bride with the assistance of his trusted consigliere, Maletesta. Deception, disguises and hilarity ensue!

The Pasquale Saga promises to be an engaging and delightful hit of the New York season. Additionally, Olivo e Pasquale has never before been performed on this continent! Amore's production will be a vibrant and exciting American debut not to be missed.

Returning to Amore to conduct Olivo e Pasquale is Gregory Buchalter of the Metropolitan Opera. Maestro Buchalter conducted last season's American premiere of I due Figaro as part of the critically acclaimed Fall Figaro Fest, as well as the 2010/2011 season's Tosca. Jason Tramm, Artistic Director of New Jersey State Opera, will be making his Amore Opera debut conducting Don Pasquale. Both productions are directed by Nathan Hull, and will run in tandem from October 19 through November 4, 2012.

All performances are at the Connelly Theater (220 East 4th Street). General admission is $40.00 and $30.00 for students and seniors. All tickets for the Opera-in-Briefs are $15.00. Tickets can be purchased directly on the Amore Opera website at www.amoreopera.org or by calling 1-888- 811-4111.

Olivo e Pasquale Performance Dates:
Tuesday, 10/23 - 7:30 PM - Press Night
Sunday, 10/28 – 2:30 PM
Wednesday, 10/31- 7:30 PM
Saturday, 11/3 – 11:30 AM (Opera-in-Brief)
Saturday, 11/3 - 7:30 PM

Don Pasquale Performance Dates:
Friday, 10/19 - 7:30 PM - Press Night
Saturday, 10/20 - 7:30 PM
Sunday, 10/21 - 2:30 PM
Thursday, 10/25 - 7:30 PM
Friday, 10/26 - 7:30 PM
Saturday, 10/27 – 11:30 AM (Opera-in-Brief)
Saturday, 10/27 - 7:30 PM
Thursday, 11/1 - 7:30 PM
Friday, 11/2 - 7:30 PM
Sunday, 11/4 - 2:30 PM




More On: Gaetano Donizetti, Jason Tramm,

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