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BWW Reviews: BalaSole Dance Company Focuses on Artistic Freedom and Process in VOCES, 1/26 and 1/27

Related: The Ailey Citigroup Theater, The Joan Weill Center for Dance, Roberto Villanueva, BalaSole

Other dancers appeared to be exploring more technical or compositional aspects in their pieces. We Could What if All Day, performed and choreographed by Jessica Cipriano, had beautiful technical aspects layered throughout. Her performance was touching and she added text to the beginning of the piece that added an interesting layer. However, the focus of her choreography centered on strong technical abilities which were lovely to watch.

While all of the solos were enjoyable and each dancer did very well at choreographing to his/her strengths, two solos greatly stood out as having captured several elements of dance making. Keeping with the Cage, an excerpt, which was choreographed by Debra Fernandez and Emily Pacilio and performed by Pacilio, was strikingly layered. The music of the piece added a sound accompaniment that offered a basis for movement exploration. The choreography was innovative and seemed to perfectly coincide with the music that was chosen. Emily Pacilio danced the solo beautifully. She had an air of confidence that entrances any audience member and she remained present throughout the piece. Node Beat, performed and choreographed by Andrew Nemr was a deep exploration of sound in dance. He provided the pre-recorded accompaniment that contained a series of notes and beats. He then tapped accordingly and together with the music made a very beautiful harmony. Since tap is very often used solely as a communicative or performance dance style, it was wonderful to see it used in a more explorative and contemporary way.

At the end of the program, I had a deep respect for each artist's creative process and for Roberto Villanueva's vision. It was fulfilling to see such vast and varying artistry emerge from a diverse group of movers, and the audience seemed quite touched by the talent and expressivity performed on stage.

Photo Credit: Maggie Picard Photography

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About Author

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Stephanie Deere Stephanie Deere began dancing at the age of three at Studio C in Los Angeles. She continued to pursue her passion and attended the University of California, Irvine as a dance major. Stephanie studied under notable choreographers such as Donald McKayle, Loretta Livingston, Jodi Gates, Lisa Naugle, Molly Lynch, and Michele Gervais. Stephanie graduated Magna Cum Laude with her BA in dance and a minor in management and moved to Los Angeles to pursue a career in dance. Currently, Stephanie lives in New York City, teaches dance, choreographs, performs with various companies and groups in the area, and is a company member with Undertoe Dance Project. She is very excited to be a part of this blossoming community of dance in New York City.


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