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Science Says Group Singing Lowers Stress, Boosts Energy

Related: Singing

Science Says Group Singing Lowers Stress, Boosts Energy

According to a report by Stacy Horn in the Life & Style section of TIME, group singing has been scientifically proven to lower stress and simultaneously calm and energize those who participate.

"What researchers are beginning to discover is that singing is like an infusion of the perfect tranquilizer, the kind that both soothes your nerves and elevates your spirits," Horn writes.

She continues: "A very recent study even attempts to make the case that 'music evolved as a tool for social living,' and that the pleasure that comes from singing together is our evolutionary reward for coming together cooperatively, instead of hiding alone."

For the full feature, head on over to TIME.

This elevated mood could be the result of endorphins or oxytocin -- both hormones released while singing -- which are associated with pleasure and lowering anxiety, respectively. Oxytocin also amplifies feelings of trust and bonding, which can combat depression with a diminished sense of loneliness. According to studies, singers often indicate lower levels of cortisol, and thus, less stress.

Even bad singers gain the same benefits as highly trained professionals. So, go join a choir! It's good for your emotional and physical wellbeing.

Pictured: LA Master Chorale. Photo Credit: Russell Scoffin.

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