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Chamber Orchestra to Perform ALL MOZART with Flutist Jeffrey Khaner & Conductor Matthias Bamert, 3/23-24

Chamber Orchestra to Perform ALL MOZART with Flutist Jeffrey Khaner & Conductor Matthias Bamert, 3/23-24

Celebrating the most influential composer of the Classical Era, former Music Director of the London Mozart Players and the Malaysian Symphony Orchestra, Matthias Bamert, leads the Chamber Orchestra in three eminent works by Mozart, including the celebrated Symphony No. 40 in G minor - the most intensely expressive and powerful of all Mozart's symphonies. Maestro Bamert will be joined by Jeffrey Khaner, Principal Flute of the Philadelphia Orchestra for Flute Concerto No. 2 in D minor, which unbeknownst to many, is an arrangement of Mozart's Oboe Concerto in C major.

MARCH 23 AND 24 AT THE KIMMEL CENTER

A founding resident company of The Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, the Chamber Orchestra's March 23 2:30 pm and March 24 7:30 pm concerts will be performed in the Kimmel Center's intimate Perelman Theater. Tickets for Chamber Orchestra performances are $24 to $81. The Sunday matinée performance will be followed by "Classical Conversations," a brief question-and-answer session with Mr. Khaner, Mr. Bamert, and Chamber Orchestra Executive Director Peter H. Gistelinck.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Symphony No. 17 in G major, K. 129

Written when Mozart was only sixteen years old, Symphony No. 17 in G major, K. 129 is a thoroughly skillful piece of work from a developing musician. The three-movement symphony demonstrates Mozart's genius and how much he had learned in his young life thus far, and also possesses striking touches of invention and individuality. As early as the piece was written, the hunting-style finale shares its main theme with the first movement of Mozart's very last piano sonata, which he wrote seventeen years later.

Flute Concerto No. 2 in D major, K. 314

Little known to most people, Mozart's well-known Flute Concerto No. 2 in D is actually an arrangement of his Oboe Concerto in C major. The discovery was made around 1920 in the archives of the Salzburg Mozarteum, where among a bundle of papers which had been gathering dust, the institution's director Bernhard Paumgartner found a set of 18th-century orchestral parts that proved to correspond with those of the Flute Concerto. The differences in the newly discovered material showed a rare piece of crucial evidence that the Flute Concerto was the arrangement. The piece remains a staple in the flute repertoire today.

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by Peter Danish