Dr. Gunnar Sevelius Looks Back to Move Forward in THE NINE PILLARS OF HISTORY

Related: THE NINE PILLARS OF HISTORY,

A new book is identifying the cause of war and economic strife with an alternative analysis of 200,000 years of human history.

In The Nine Pillars of History, Dr. Gunnar Sevelius identifies nine common denominators - factors that have been central to all cultures from the beginning of civilization - in an expert analysis of history, society, religion, sexuality and economics.

Presented as a discussion of nonpolitical, nonreligious thoughts, the book explores the evolution of 30 major cultures and five world religions, partnering the pillars with the widely acknowledged Golden Rule. Sevelius aims to provide insight into what happens if these pillars are not present, referring to past, present and future examples including the collapse of the USSR, the Arab Spring, Wall Street demonstrations and potential democratization of China.

"John Locke and the American Constitution are what inspired me to revert to tribal times and define the nine basic social and physical human needs," says Sevelius. "This technique allowed me to identify the cause of war and a guide for peace... Many of today's political and economic problems can be addressed through the vision presented in this book."

Sevelius, whose impression of World War II and marriage to a refugee bring to the book a personal perspective, is seeking to give hope to those who have found few answers in their search for life's meaning. In The Nine Pillars of History, Sevelius touches on relevant themes such as colliding dogmatic cultures (North Korea and Iran), uneven capital distribution (Africa) and female struggle for equality (Afghanistan).

Aiming to stimulate discussion of social needs that have transcended millennia, The Nine Pillars of History explores these interrelated subjects and answers why war happens - while providing a roadmap to peace.

Gunnar Sevelius, M.D., grew up in neutral Sweden during WWII. While surrounded by the realities of a war-torn Europe, he asked himself: Why do people go to war?
Sevelius eventually married an Estonian medical colleague, and after a busy life as a medical scientist, practicing physician, medical director at NASA and Lockheed Missile and Space Company and besides farming in both Sweden and California, he again took up the question of war.

On top of his medical education, Sevelius received academic input on this topic from professors in multiple disciplines at Stanford and San Francisco Universities in the United States and Lund University in Sweden; this in conjunction with nine years of complimentary studies has resulted in his unique review of social history and human rights.




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