art.broadwayworld.com

Smithsonian's Sackler Gallery Presents Largest U.S. Display of American Master James McNeill Whistler, 5/3

Smithsonian's Sackler Gallery Presents Largest U.S. Display of American Master James McNeill Whistler, 5/3

"An American in London: Whistler and the Thames," opening May 3 at the Smithsonian's Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, is the first major exhibition ever devoted to American artist James McNeill Whistler's early period in London, and it is the largest U.S. display of his work in almost 20 years. The exhibition showcases changing views of the capital city's iconic riverbanks and waterways, revealing how Whistler emerged as one of the most innovative and original artists of the 19th century while London evolved into a modern city.

"Whistler was one of the most influential painters of his time, and now in a single show we're able to look at the transformation of his work and the transformation of a city," explained Julian Raby, The Dame Jillian Sackler Director of the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery and Freer Gallery of Art. "This is a huge opportunity for the U.S. public to celebrate one of their greatest artistic figures."

On view through Aug. 17, the exhibition features more than 80 works from major museums in the U.S. and Britain, including 20 important oil paintings of Chelsea and the Thames, masterful prints and rarely seen drawings, watercolors and pastels. The exhibition culminates with an ensemble of the artist's famous Nocturnes, including the iconic "Blue and Gold: Old Battersea Bridge." Other highlights include the daytime industrial landscape "Brown and Silver: Old Battersea Bridge," the schooners at rest captured in "Wapping" and selections from the Thames Set, an early series of etchings depicting the river's seedy dockyards and dubious characters.

The Sackler's presentation is the final venue of a three-city tour (previously at Dulwich Picture Gallery in London and the Addison Gallery of American Art, Massachusetts) and will be enhanced by the addition of nearly 50 masterpieces from the Freer Gallery of Art, which holds the world's largest and finest collection of the artist's work, including the famous Peacock Room. Museum founder Charles Lang Freer met Whistler in London in 1890 and became his most important patron. This is the first time since the Freer Gallery opened in 1923 that these works will be on view with Whistlers from other institutions.

Changing Art for a Changing City

"An American in London" focuses on the period during the 1860s and '70s when Whistler (18341903) adapted the realist style he developed in Paris into a more personal aesthetic: "art for art's sake." He transformed scenes of gritty contemporary life, especially along the Thames riverbank, into moody and poetic views of the city, layered with color and atmosphere. It was during this time that he started to give his works musical titles such as "arrangement," "symphony" and "nocturne" and drew inspiration from the composition and flattened forms of Japanese prints, some of which are included in the exhibition.

"Whistler developed radically new modes of expression as a response to the changing world outside his window in London's Chelsea neighborhood," said Lee Glazer, curator of American art at the Freer and Sackler galleries. "Through the visual poetry of his 'arrangements' and 'nocturnes' he reasserted the value of beauty, providing aesthetic compensation for the loss and alienation many Victorians associated with modern life."


Become a Fan, Follower & Subscriber

FROM THE EDITOR
BWW Reviews: The Bronx Museum, Sze It Now and Burcaw's Street MuralBWW Reviews: The Bronx Museum, Sze It Now and Burcaw's Street Mural
by Barry Kostrinsky