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Rare Works by Caillette to Be Exhibited in Basel, Today

Rare Works by Caillette to Be Exhibited in Basel, Today

René Jean Caillette
Demisch Danant
Design Miami/Basel
Hall 1 Süd, Booth G23
June 17-22, 2014

For Design Miami/Basel 2014, Demisch Danant will present a René Jean Caillette, solo exhibition devoted to the legendary French designer, featuring rare and important works of the 1950s and 1960s. The exhibition will include unique designs and rare prototypes acquired from Caillette's estate, including objects never before exhibited publicly.

The exhibition will be on view 17 - 22 June 2014, at Booth G23, Hall 1 Süd at the Messe Basel.

Caillette's exemplary creations will be presented in three distinct living environments, each focused upon a specific period of the designer's prolific career. One vignette will present works designed between 1956 and 1958, including the Diamond Chair, a signature Caillette piece that today is considered an icon of postwar European design. A second area of the exhibition will be a bedroom environment inspired by Caillette's 1962 presentation at the Salon des Arts Ménager for Charron, and will include a rare vanity, a prototype for an armchair, and an impressive upholstered bed with attached light tables. A living room environment based on a 1966 presentation at the Salon des Arts Ménager will complete the presentation and include rare prototypes for a sofa and low table.

René Jean Caillette (1919-2004) was among a group of young designers who emerged immediately following the reconstruction period that followed World War II. They were dedicated to designing elegant and accessible furniture in a resolutely modern spirit, stripped of decoration and produced in series. In 1950, prominent French furniture manufacturer George Charron discovered Caillette's work and sought out the designer. Their meeting led to the creation of Group 4, a collaboration between Caillette, Alain Richard, Genevieve Dangles, and Joseph André Motte. Caillette received the René Gabriel prize in 1952 and the Milan Triennale Silver Medal in 1962, and continued to design for Charron until 1972. Throughout his illustrious career, Caillette adhered to a rigorous development and prototyping process, and remained committed to simplicity of line and material innovation.


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