art.broadwayworld.com

NEW YORK CITY Articles
Click Here for More Articles on NEW YORK CITY...

November 2011 Public Programs Announced For N-Y Historical Society

November 2011 Public Programs Announced For N-Y Historical SocietyNovember 2011 Public Programs Announced For N-Y Historical Society

The New-York Historical Society will re-open its landmark building to the public at 11 am on Veterans' Day, Friday, November 11, 2011. A three-year renovation of the Central Park West building has sensitively but thoroughly transformed the face of the institution-the first museum established in New York-to welcome visitors of all ages to a great cultural destination, and to immerse them, from the moment they enter the building, in New-York Historical's collection of extraordinary objects and sweeping ideas.

PUBLIC PROGRAMS:

To purchase tickets to public programs and gallery tours by phone, please call the New-York Historical Society's new call center at (212) 485-9268 or visit nyhistory.org/programs. Programs and walking tours $24 (Members $12) unless otherwise noted.

Bernard and Irene Schwartz Distinguished Speakers Series:

American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era
Presented at the New York Society for Ethical Culture at 2 West 64th Street at Central Park West
Thursday, November 3, 6:30 PM
David W. Blight, Drew Gilpin Faust

This program transports us to the 1963 centennial celebration of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation to explore how Americans made sense of the suffering, loss and liberation that had wracked the United States a century earlier. David W. Blight and Drew Gilpin Faust discuss how four of America's most incisive writers-including Robert Penn Warren, a white southerner who recanted his support for segregation, and James Baldwin, the searing African-American essayist and activist-explored the gulf between remembrance and reality.

New York on the Cusp: The City When Carnegie Hall Debuted
Presented at the New York Society for Ethical Culture at 2 West 64th Street at Central Park West

Thursday, November 10, 6:30 PM
Barry Lewis

When Carnegie Hall opened in 1891, New York was still an intensely Victorian commercial city, and rock-hewn neo-Romanesque and arts and crafts Queen Anne were the predominant styles. Elevators were sending buildings to unprecedented heights and middle class people were gingerly trying the brand-new idea of apartment house living. But McKim, Mead & White's recently completed Villard Houses and their fantastic Madison Square Garden announced to New York that things were about to change.

George Washington Night!

Tuesday, November 15, 6:30 PM

Presented at the Robert H. Smith Auditorium at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West

Joseph J. Ellis, David Hackett Fischer, Theodore J. Crackel, Stacy Schiff

There is no more iconic figure in American history than George Washington, our first president and most famous Founding Father. Come celebrate the grand reopening of the New-York Historical Society and its newly renovated theater at this in-depth discussion of Washington's life with some of the nation's most distinguished historians of the founding era.

Dangerous Ambition: Rebecca West and Dorothy Thompson
Wednesday, November 16, 6:30 PM
Presented at the Robert H. Smith Auditorium at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West

Susan Hertog

Dorothy Thompson was the first female head of a European news bureau, and a columnist and commentator whom Time magazine once ranked alongside Eleanor Roosevelt as the most influential woman in America. Rebecca West blazed a trail for herself as a journalist, literary critic, novelist and historian. In a pre-feminist era when speaking truth to power could get anyone- of either gender-ostracized, blacklisted or worse, these two smart, self-made women lived strikingly parallel lives that placed them at the center of the social and historical upheavals of the 20th century. Join us for a special Stephen Starr restaurant tasting following the program.

American and Haitian Revolutions and the Abolition of the Atlantic Slave Trade

Thursday, November 17, 6:30 PM
Presented at the Robert H. Smith Auditorium at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West

David Brion Davis, Peter P. Hinks, Richard J. M. Blackett, David W. Blight

The late 18th and early 19th centuries were a time of upheaval and revolution. In conjunction with the new exhibition, Revolution!, historians examine the tumultuous 30-year period which saw the American and Haitian Revolutions and the end of the transatlantic slave trade to the U.S. and the British colonies. How were these events related and what forces combined to effect so much social change in such a short span?

Related Articles



Become a Fan, Follower & Subscriber