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'MADELINE IN NEW YORK' to Launch N-Y Historical Society's July 2014 Exhibitions

Related: New York Historical Society
'MADELINE IN NEW YORK' to Launch N-Y Historical Society's July 2014 Exhibitions

New-York Historical Society has announced its July 2014 temporary and permanent exhibitions. Details below!

All exhibitions are presented at the New-York Historical Society unless otherwise noted.


TEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS

Madeline in New York: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans

July 04, 2014 - October 19, 2014

To celebrate the 75th anniversary of Madeline's publication, the New-York Historical Society will honor the beloved schoolgirl and her creator Ludwig Bemelmans with an exhibition of more than 90 original artworks. In addition to drawings from all six Madeline books, the exhibition will also feature Bemelmans' drawings of the old Ritz Hotel in New York, murals from a rediscovered Paris bistro, panels from the Onassis yacht, and a cache of fabrics based on an early picture book.

The Works: Salon Style at the New-York Historical Society

June 20, 2014 - February 08, 2015

Salon Style is a method of hanging a gallery that emphasizes the complexity and richness of a collection, often done in the collections of the European royal courts to connote taste and opulence. By the nineteenth century Salon Style was used by private art clubs to squeeze as many works into a gallery as possible. This installation displays numerous gems from the New-York Historical Society's permanent collection in nineteenth-century Salon Style, showcasing the depth and range of our holdings. Everything from self-portraits of Asher Durand to Hudson River School landscapes to religious and history paintings will be on view, in close proximity that unites these typically separate styles.

"I Live. Send Help." 100 Years of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee

June 13, 2014 - September 21, 2014

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) was founded in New York City in 1914 as a response to the plight of Jews in Europe and Palestine at the outset of World War I. Since then, JDC has become a premiere humanitarian organization helping Jews and non-Jews the world over in times of need. On the occasion of its 100 year anniversary, this exhibition will recount the history of the JDC from its creation to its most recent relief activities rebuilding Jewish communities of the former Soviet Union, and in aiding Filipinos in the wake of the devastation of Typhoon Haiyan. Included in this celebratory exhibition will be photographs, objects, and films that bring the JDC's poignant stories to life.

Homefront & Battlefield: Quilts & Context in the Civil War

April 4, 2014 - August 17, 2014

To mark the 150th anniversary of the Civil War (1861-1865), the New-York Historical Society presents a groundbreaking traveling exhibition, Homefront & Battlefield: Quilts & Context in the Civil War, organized by the American Textile History Museum. The exhibition uses quilts, textiles, clothing, and other artifacts to connect deeply moving and insightful personal stories about the war, its causes, and its aftermath with the broader national context and public history.

The Black Fives

March 14, 2014 - July 20, 2014

This exhibition covers the pioneering history of the African-American basketball teams that existed in New York City and elsewhere from the early 1900s through 1950, the year the National Basketball Association became racially integrated. Just after the game of basketball was invented in 1891, teams were often called "fives" in reference to their five starting players. Dozens of all-black teams emerged during the Black Fives Era, in New York City, Washington, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Chicago, Atlantic City, Cleveland, and other cities where a substantial African-American population lived. The Black Fives Era came to an end in the late 1940s with the growth in stature of black college basketball programs combined with the gradual racial integration of previously whites-only collegiate basketball conferences and professional basketball leagues. The overarching significance of the Black Fives Era is that it is as much about the forward progress of black culture as a whole as it is about the history of basketball. This history is relevant today not only as a realization of our collective basketball roots but also as a search for identity.

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