art.broadwayworld.com

Edward Hopper Paintings Hung in Oval Office

���
Edward Hopper Paintings Hung in Oval Office

Two paintings by Edward Hopper (1882-1967), widely recognized as one of the most significant artists of the 20th century, were hung in the Oval Office on Friday, February 7, 2014. Cobb's Barns, South Truro, and Burly Cobb's House, South Truro -- oil on canvas works painted in 1930-33 on Cape Cod -- have been lent by the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the world's largest repository of Hopper's works.


Before building a house on Cape Cod in 1934, Hopper and his wife rented a hillside cottage for four summers. From that house, Hopper executed a series of paintings and drawings of the buildings on their landlord's farm below, exploring the structures from several angles and at different times of the day.

Emblematic examples of his work, the two paintings lent by the Whitney Museum capture the strong sense of atmosphere and light as well as the empty stillness that characterize much of Hopper's imagery. They also demonstrate Hopper's fascination with the various forms of this country's vernacular architecture -- a subject he would return to again and again, resulting in some of the most enduring images of American art.


Become a Fan, Follower & Subscriber

FROM THE EDITOR
BWW Reviews: The Bronx Museum, Sze It Now and Burcaw's Street MuralBWW Reviews: The Bronx Museum, Sze It Now and Burcaw's Street Mural
by Barry Kostrinsky