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Arnold Friberg's Original Eight Faces of Moses from the 1956 Film THE TEN COMMANDMENTS Up for Auction, 7/19

Related: Eight Faces of Moses, RR Auction, Arnold Friberg, THE TEN COMMANDMENTS
Arnold Friberg's Original Eight Faces of Moses from the 1956 Film THE TEN COMMANDMENTS Up for Auction, 7/19

Boston, Mass. -- RR Auction presents the Eight Faces of Moses collection created by renowned artist Arnold Friberg for Cecil B. DeMille's masterful 1956 remaking of The Ten Commandments in a live auction event that will take place this Saturday at RR Auction's Boston Gallery.

"For 60 years the paintings were unrecognized as Friberg's work -- in fact they were misattributed, believed to the work of the films makeup artists," says Lawrence Jeppson, a distinguished historian and art consultant, who made the discovery earlier this year after viewing the paintings.

Since the late 1960s, the paintings have been in The Possession of the Westmore family and attributed to Wally Westmore himself. Westmore's grandson, had assumed his grandfather was the author of the unsigned artwork. Eventually, the creator of the artwork became a disputed topic -- the auction house reached out to Jeppson for his expertise on Friberg's works.

Wally and Frank Westmore, makeup artists on the film, used the original oil paintings as the templates for Charlton Heston's makeup as he transformed from a young slave to a wizened prophet, they are among the finest pieces of Hollywood art ever to come to market.

One of the greatest challenges in believably telling the epic tale was in Charlton Heston's transformation as Moses. Spanning an entire lifetime -- from his days as a young slave in Egypt to his final encounter with God on Mt. Nebo as an old, wizened man -- the legendary actor's face needed not only to age, but also to reflect within it the experiences that shaped him.


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