It's Getting Hotter In The North (From SHOWBOAT)

Mr. Nowack
Broadway Star
joined:2/2/14
What is the general consensus on this number? I like it, but it was cut due to length and is never even talked about. Is it just too long and somewhat irrelevant and unnecessary coming at such a late stage in the already very long story?

Also, does anybody know why they didn't reinstate it back into the Hal Prince production, even a shortened version? i believe they did pretty much the same thing with a charleston version of "Why Do I Love You."
If you haven't heard it, here's a YouTube clip
I was previously known as Mr. Nowak (Joined: 5/20/13).
Smaxie
Broadway Legend
joined:9/26/05
The notes in the John McGlinn Show Boat recording explain the reason why it was cut. I believe it was because Norma Terris called it "a lousy jazz song" and didn't want to sing it. Too bad. It's a great song and - typical of Kern - brilliantly constructed, melodically and thematically. The melody recalls Magnolia's piano exercise from her first scene. The jazz sound of it is meant to be jarringly different from the rest of the score, denoting the passage of time/change of an era. And as I think McGlinn wrote, the strings are playing some mournful chromatics that give a sense of sadness over the passage of time. I wish the Hal Prince production had used it. I'd love to see it reinstated into a production someday.
Begin at the beginning and go on till you come to the end: then stop.
EricMontreal22
Broadway Legend
joined:10/31/11
The 1970s book on ShowBoat goes into details too. But, as the OP who asked the question said:

"What is the general consensus on this number? I like it, but it was cut due to length and is never even talked about. Is it just too long and somewhat irrelevant and unnecessary coming at such a late stage in the already very long story? "

I think those are exactly the reasons. The show ran something like 4 hours out of town, so to have a 9 minute number with no story connection at the end made zero sense. Of course they could have dropped most of the dancing, but, while the number does slightly reference the change in America at the time, I still think it really just wouldn't work.

The actress was good at imitations, so they had her do that Why Do I Love You "modern" celeb imitation bit instead--and I think it was about 2 mins. In London they replaced that with the lovely but bland Dance Away the Night but it's fairly short too. Personally I like the "modern" sounding Nobody Like Me added there for the 40s revival.

And of course the original production later did a jazzy version with charlestan of Why Do I Love You instead of the imitations--as the McGill cast album does. The 1980s Papermill production which was one of the first in a long time to try to restore much of the original production did it that way too as shown here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_eKzieB0_NA (I wish I could track down the full PBS broadcast of that production--I know someillegal DVD sites sell it for an arm and a leg, but..)

Still I mostly liked what Prince did (I wish they could have kept "In Dahomey" myself--but hey I also love Hey Feller...) and it really would have been hard to fit into his production.

The Charlestan you mention, which used much of Hey Feller orchestrally was an effectie montage showing the passage of time and I thought Stroman did it well. It did end with the Charlestan.