History of Stage Dooring

ErinDillyFan
Broadway Star
joined:7/14/06
History of Stage Dooring
Posted: 1/2/13 at 12:52pm
When did the practice of hanging out at the stage door become a big deal? I went to see "Amadeus" in the summer of 1981 and a friend wrote a love letter to Amy Irving and asked me to go to the stage door. I went after the show and knocked on the door and gave the letter to whoever answered the door. There was no one hanging out around the door like there would be now...
FindingNamo
Broadway Legend
joined:7/22/03
History of Stage Dooring
Posted: 1/2/13 at 12:56pm
It's always a good idea to generalize based on a single experience.
"I hate dead people!" -- Joan Rivers. A Piece of Work
madbrian
Broadway Legend
joined:6/1/06
History of Stage Dooring
Posted: 1/2/13 at 12:58pm
Well, if the show Follies is to be believed, folks have been hanging around stage doors since the earliest days of musical theater. Also, in the movie Whatever Happened To Baby Jane, folks were hanging around the stage door all the way back in Vaudeville days.
"It does me no injury for my neighbour to say there are 20 gods or no god. It neither picks my pocket, nor breaks my leg." -- Thomas Jefferson
FindingNamo
Broadway Legend
joined:7/22/03
History of Stage Dooring
Posted: 1/2/13 at 12:59pm
Let's face it, Amy Irving was no Baby Jane.
"I hate dead people!" -- Joan Rivers. A Piece of Work
Jordan Catalano
Broadway Legend
joined:10/9/05
History of Stage Dooring
Posted: 1/2/13 at 01:00pm
I saw Sarah Jessica Parker in ONCE UPON A MATTRESS in December, 1996. After the show myself and my father were the only ones who were at the stage door. After about 10 minutes, someone came out and said that it looked like we were freezing and did we want to come inside and wait. SJP came down a few minutes later and chatted and took pictures with us and was ridiculously sweet.


You're telling me that doesn't happen at every show, Namo?
Kelly2
Broadway Legend
joined:1/5/07
History of Stage Dooring
Posted: 1/2/13 at 01:05pm
To an extent, it has been around for a long time, but it has not been around in it's current form for very long. Today's "stage door" is the wild wild west.
"Get mad, then get over it." - Colin Powell
Kelly2
Broadway Legend
joined:1/5/07
History of Stage Dooring
Posted: 1/2/13 at 01:05pm
To an extent, it has been around for a long time, but it has not been around in it's current form for very long. Today's "stage door" is the wild wild west.
"Get mad, then get over it." - Colin Powell
Jordan Catalano
Broadway Legend
joined:10/9/05
History of Stage Dooring
Posted: 1/2/13 at 01:08pm
To an extent, it has been around for a long time, but it has not been around in it's current form for very long. Today's "stage door" is the wild wild west.
Rainbowhigh23
Broadway Legend
joined:3/29/12
History of Stage Dooring
Posted: 1/2/13 at 01:12pm
Didn't men wait at stagedoor to meet the Floradora girls in the 1800s?
FindingNamo
Broadway Legend
joined:7/22/03
History of Stage Dooring
Posted: 1/2/13 at 01:13pm
Does that analogy not suggest it's been around since the mid-1800s?
"I hate dead people!" -- Joan Rivers. A Piece of Work
madbrian
Broadway Legend
joined:6/1/06
History of Stage Dooring
Posted: 1/2/13 at 01:16pm
Dictionary.com gives the origin of 'stage door Johnny' as an American term coined around 1910-1915.
"It does me no injury for my neighbour to say there are 20 gods or no god. It neither picks my pocket, nor breaks my leg." -- Thomas Jefferson
JoeKv99
Broadway Legend
joined:12/27/04
History of Stage Dooring
Posted: 1/2/13 at 01:16pm
I disagree. To an extent, it has been around for a long time, but it has not been around in it's current form for very long. Today's "stage door" is the wild wild west.


No good can possibly come from using this vast wasteland of error and deliberate deceit. You should get off of it and warn others away. You should make sure your children and grandchildren know what a corrupt and morally bankrupt institution it truly is.
sbflyfan
Broadway Star
joined:4/12/07
History of Stage Dooring
Posted: 1/2/13 at 01:16pm
Even Meryl Streep goes to the stage door, but not for the reasons we do...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KwP3IATjUo
"I'm seeing the LuPone in Key West later this week. I'm hoping for great vocals and some sort of insane breakdown..." - BenjaminNicholas2

Dr. Jennifer Rinaldi will live on forever. Someone get her a Tony.
OrdinaryJukebox
Featured Actor
joined:6/7/06
History of Stage Dooring
Posted: 1/3/13 at 09:50am
Stage-Dooring is interesting to me. I've only done it for actors I adore and just need to meet (Amy Brenneman at the stage door of "Rapture, Blister, Burn, LaChanze in "The Color Purple"), but I often make a fool of myself by not being able to articulate a sentence clearly. I get way too "star-struck."

It bothers me that people get annoyed if actors don't stop or if they don't come out. Is it nice when/if they do? Sure, of course it is. However, it's not part of their job. It's not in their contract (at least not any contract I've ever seen), and it's just as rude of an audience member to expect it and feel that it's the actors obligation. Maybe they're exhausted, had a bad day, aren't feeling well, etc. We all want a great story like the one about SJP in "Once Upon a Mattress," because we all want to believe that the actors we admire and watch are down-to-earth, sweet, humble people. However, sometimes, they're not and that's okay ... I want to see a great performance. If I get that, they've done their job. If they take a photo with people, that's just gravy. Sorry for the rambling ... :P
artscallion
Broadway Legend
joined:5/15/07
History of Stage Dooring
Posted: 1/15/13 at 12:49pm
Stage struck Johnnies turned Sarah Jessica Parker's mattress into the wild wild west as recently as 1996. But I believe the tradition goes much further back than that.
Art has a double face, of expression and illusion.