Sweeney Todd - A Little Priest Question

Musicaldudepeter
Broadway Star
joined:3/18/10
Can someone please explain why the following line is so funny - it brings down the house every time it is sung - i don't know why!!! :

"Since marine doesn't appeal to you, how about rear admiral?"
"No, no, it's too salty."
Dollypop
Broadway Legend
joined:5/15/03
Admirals are on boats.

Boats are in salt water and salty air.

Admirals=salty.


Geeze!
"Long live God!" (GODSPELL)
minicko88
Featured Actor
joined:7/12/07
I got that one, but the one I never understand is "Locksmith"?
dramamama611
Broadway Legend
joined:12/4/07
^That one is more in the delivery -- there's no rhyme and they are forced to abandon that round of the game.
If we're not having fun, then why are we doing it? These are DISCUSSION boards, not mutual admiration boards. Discussion only occurs when we are willing to hear what others are thinking, regardless of whether it is alignment to our own thoughts.
Glitter and be Gay
Stand-by
joined:9/26/07
Sweeney and Mrs. Lovett are trading rhymes back and forth, each one trying to top the other, then she throws out "locksmith" and stumps him. He can't rhyme it and she knows it. She takes a beat then changes tack and the song continues.
minicko88
Featured Actor
joined:7/12/07
ahhh GOT YA!
[tos]fan999
Leading Actor
joined:12/21/07
It took me a full year after I first heard the score to get the Locksmith joke...I was too embarrassed to ask anyone.
<-----Bernadette Peters and Alexander Hanson in A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC.

Send in the clowns...Send in the crowds!

"I prefer neurotic people. I like to hear rumblings beneath the surface."-Stephen Sondheim
mallardo
Broadway Legend
joined:5/28/04
In British slang a sailor is a "salt". Retired sailors are often referred to as old salts.
Faced with these Loreleis, what man can moralize!
maggiemar142
Chorus Member
joined:4/24/10
not to be a prick, but it's "royal admiral". she's just using a british accent when she says it.
ghostlight2
Broadway Legend
joined:12/5/04
^ ^ ^ ^

Are you quite sure? It's definitely "royal marine", but I'm pretty sure it's rear admiral".
maggiemar142
Chorus Member
joined:4/24/10
i don't have a libretto, but i'm fairly sure it's "royal" both times.
Updated On: 9/4/10 at 01:34 PM
ghostlight2
Broadway Legend
joined:12/5/04
musikman
Leading Actor
joined:8/31/06
MRS. LOVETT: Since marine doesn't appeal to you, how about rear admiral?
TODD: Too salty. I prefer general.
MRS. LOVETT: With or without his privates? "With" is extra. (TODD chortles)

you might be confusing it with this? :

MRS. LOVETT:
Well, then, if you're British and loyal,
You might enjoy Royal
Marine.
(TODD makes a face)
Anyway, it's clean.
Though, of course, it tastes of wherever it's been.
-There's the muddle in the middle. There's the puddle where the poodle did the piddle."
maggiemar142
Chorus Member
joined:4/24/10
yea, Angela does a very clear "rear" and Patti's sounds more like "royal". and it would be very unlike Sondheim to reuse a word like that. so i guess i was wrong. sorry, ghostlight. sorry, musicaldudepeter.
Updated On: 9/5/10 at 02:17 PM
ghostlight2
Broadway Legend
joined:12/5/04
Edited so as not to be mean - but honestly, when you go to correct someone, you should first be sure you're right. Beyond that, when it's proven that you're wrong in your correction of someone else, graciously concede and admit your error. Don't grudgingly say that they're "probably right" when they definitely are.


Updated On: 9/4/10 at 08:06 PM
AwesomeDanny
Broadway Legend
joined:7/30/09
In the "general--with or without his privates," I get that line, but I don't understand the "with is extra" line.
iflip4musicals
Broadway Star
joined:11/30/06
I always assumed she was saying that she would charge extra if someone wanted the general with his privates.
"I've never encountered such religiously, you know, loyal fans as Broadway musical theater fans. It's amazing." --Allison Janney
AwesomeDanny
Broadway Legend
joined:7/30/09
That's what I thought, but the laugh always comes after "with is extra", and I think it should come after "with or without his privates?".
abitoftap
Broadway Star
joined:3/16/08
"with or without his privates?"....which is almost a classic carry on... line.
jasonf
Broadway Legend
joined:12/26/03
I had a prof. at school who said this song was perfect except for one mistake -- in England, politicians "stand" for office not "run" as in "Here's a politician so oily it's served with a doily have one. Put it on a bun, well you never know if it's going to run"
Hi, Shirley Temple Pudding.
A Little Priest
Swing
joined:4/6/10
This is especially embarrassing considering my username, but I've never quite understood why the trouble with poet is, how do you know it's deceased?
Updated On: 9/5/10 at 02:04 PM
StageManager2
Broadway Legend
joined:10/21/05
Rhyming for the sake of rhyming. Porter did it all the time (see "You're the Top").
Salve, Regina, Mater misericordiae
Vita, dulcedo, et spes nostra
Salve, Salve Regina
Ad te clamamus exsules filii Eva
Ad te suspiramus, gementes et flentes
O clemens O pia
AEA AGMA SM
Broadway Legend
joined:8/13/09
Think along the lines of the modern emo/goth poet, stereotypically shown as depressed, moping, and brooding. Many of the poets of the Romantic period were much the same.

So, is this poet just sitting around depressed and moping, or is he dead?
Did you know that every day Mexican gays cross our borders and unplug our brain-dead ladies?
ghostlight2
Broadway Legend
joined:12/5/04
^ ^ ^ ^

What AEA SM said. It is a great rhyme, though.
StageManager2
Broadway Legend
joined:10/21/05
BTW: jasonf, that's like when Henry Higgins sings "By law she should be taken out and hung / for the cold-blooded murder of the English tongue." A grammar nazi like he would know it's "hanged."

Also, in "An Ordinary Man" he keeps saying "... than to ever let a woman in my life." It really should be "... than EVER to let a woman in my life." But I suppose it hurts the music... or rhyme in the case above.

Still, it goes against character.
Salve, Regina, Mater misericordiae
Vita, dulcedo, et spes nostra
Salve, Salve Regina
Ad te clamamus exsules filii Eva
Ad te suspiramus, gementes et flentes
O clemens O pia
Updated On: 9/5/10 at 03:07 PM
tazber
Broadway Legend
joined:5/10/05
Ha! I never got the poet line either. It's such a great rhyme it never really bothered me, but AEA AGMA SM's explanation makes it that much sweeter.

Thanks!
....but the world goes 'round

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