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Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by willep 2013-02-20 21:54:08


Apparently he stopped the show to call out an audience member.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Jordan Catalano 2013-02-20 21:56:07


He was filming the show from the front row?


EL OH EL

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by FindingNamo 2013-02-20 22:36:44


"Steve Pozgay"?

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by LizzieCurry 2013-02-20 23:02:06


Wow, that just out-examiner.com'd every examiner.com story I've ever read.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by ElphabaRose 2013-02-20 23:11:11


He did the same thing to someone filming when I saw The Producers during the beginning of the run years ago.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by winston89 2013-02-20 23:15:05


Very very unprofessional.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Deena Jones 2013-02-20 23:27:33


He stopped the show when someone was taking a picture in The Producers when I saw it. It TOTALLY ruined the show for me...

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Borstalboy 2013-02-20 23:28:34


Good for him. People are entitled and obnoxious about these things.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Kad 2013-02-20 23:31:11


Ushers and house managers can only do so much.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by winston89 2013-02-21 00:37:34


Borstalboy,

I don't think that anyone is coming off as entitled about an actor yelling from the stage at one audience member who is doing the wrong thing. Now, for the record, I haven't been at a performance where this has happend. But, the reason why I am saying that it is unprofessional is that if I were paying to see a show and this did occur, I was paying to see the show, not to have an actor spoil it for me by yelling at one audience member. It's kinda like that old saying, the needs of the many outweigh the needs of a few. In other words, there are more people who paid to see a performer in a show that don't know that the filming is happening then people that do.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Bueo 2013-02-21 01:25:00


At least it woke me up

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by darreyl102 2013-02-21 02:29:57


I feel it's unprofessional as it breaks the fourth wall and ruins the scene- why coulden't he have just alerted the stage manager or someone else backstage to alert the staff of the theatre to deal with it?

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by AnythingGoes23 2013-02-21 03:29:44


I congratulate Broderick and actors that do this, obnoxious audience members like this should be told and made to feel guilty. It's not unprofessional at all.

It's bad luck if your in the audience and its ruined the natural flow of the production, but for me, having some idiot with camera on would have done that. It's live, it would be the same if light didn't work, or the set stalled, its just unlucky if you we're attending that show but for a few seconds breaking the fourth wall it shouldn't ruin your evening too much surely and stop idiots filming not ruining theatre by posting that video around so people don't come and experience the show in its natural glory.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Bueo 2013-02-21 04:06:51


they did something illegal and Matthew did not like it so he responded so what ?
its his right

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by ghostlight2 2013-02-21 05:42:59


This should be retitled Lupone pulls a Broderick. He's been doing thus for ages - and I don't have a problem with it. If the front of house staff isn't able to do their job discretely, then someone has to do it blatantly.

I also don't get this "Oh, I'm such a fragile flower of an audience that it totally ruins the experience for me when an actor breaks the 4th wall for a moment to address something that is distracting him" and, btw, is ILLEGAL.






Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by EponineAmneris 2013-02-21 06:52:43


Good for Matthew!!! This HAS to stop.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by AC126748 2013-02-21 08:39:51


Some of those responses are ridiculous. "Actors need to be more appreciate of audiences"? So that means actors should just let someone seated in the front row continue doing something they've been explicitly told not to do, which is also illegal?

To me, there's no difference between a teacher who interrupts a lecture to admonish a student for texting & an actor stopping a performance. Broderick was within his rights.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Kad 2013-02-21 09:44:25


If you want to see actors incapable of being interrupted by the audience, go see a movie.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Reginald Tresilian 2013-02-21 09:58:55


I'm with ghostlight and Kad.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by CarlosAlberto 2013-02-21 10:12:10


I'm with ghostlight, Kad and Tresilian

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Playbilly 2013-02-21 10:16:47


Why couldn't Broderick tell someone to nab the guy when he's next offstage? I'd ask for my money back if an actor did that. And I'd get up in a quiet moment.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by givesmevoice 2013-02-21 10:18:42


When I saw Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf, three cellphones went off during the show, INCLUDING the very last scene. Both Tracy Letts and Amy Morton were visibly annoyed about it during the curtain call, and I wish one of them had said something (about any of the phones). Theater patrons need to realize that they're out among other members of society and can't just do whatever they feel like doing.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Reginald Tresilian 2013-02-21 10:22:01


Right. And once that's happened, I'm already taken out of the moment, so the actors might just as well address it. I imagine that would be more of a deterrent than a quiet reprimand by an usher at the next opportunity.

(Of course, I can understand why folks would feel the opposite.)

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by givesmevoice 2013-02-21 10:26:37


Right. And once that's happened, I'm already taken out of the moment, so the actors might just as well address it. I imagine that would be more of a deterrent than a quiet reprimand by an usher at the next opportunity.

There's never a good moment for a cell phone, but that last one was so poorly timed that I could have cried. It broke the moment for me, and I kind of wanted Amy Morton to break from the scene and tell that person that they had ruined the momentum of the play for so many people.


(but then of course she would've been deemed unprofessional for not going forth)

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Reginald Tresilian 2013-02-21 10:34:03


She could have done it in character. It would have been terrifying.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by madbrian 2013-02-21 10:38:33


Though I'd prefer that an actor handle the problem otherwise, such as notifying theater staff while he or she is offstage, I can't fault Broderick or anyone else. And irrespective of how or if an actor addresses the problem, let's not lose focus on the fact that the problem lies with the moron using his or her phone. Once the actor has been distracted, we've all already suffered, no matter how or if the situation is addressed.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by sparrman 2013-02-21 10:43:29


Seems to me to be two different issues. A cellphone going off disrupts the show for everyone in the theatre, actors and audience alike. The mood is already broken, so an actor might as well go ahead and say something about it.

But someone can videotape a show with almost no one being aware of it, the possible glow from the little screen notwithstanding. Thus, the actor calling the audience member out is the one who is breaking the mood. Part of an actor's job is to deal with myriad distractions, both onstage and off, including the little red light in the front row. I don't think what Broderick did was proper. He should have talked to stage management, who can then deal with house management.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by AC126748 2013-02-21 10:50:46


I'd ask for my money back if an actor did that.

And you'd be laughed at by the house manager, the box office, etc.

But someone can videotape a show with almost no one being aware of it, the possible glow from the little screen notwithstanding.

Having previously witnessed someone brazenly bootlegging a show with an iPhone, I can tell you that it is distracting and noticeable. Not to mention, as many other already have on this thread, illegal.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by yankeefan7 2013-02-21 11:06:57


While I feel bad for the rest of the audience, I think it is great. Maybe a star performer embarrassing the person in front of the entire audience may have more of a effect than a house usher telling them to stop. IMO - you catch a person doing this they should be thrown out of theatre not just told to stop.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by ghostlight2 2013-02-21 11:06:57


"But someone can videotape a show with almost no one being aware of it, the possible glow from the little screen notwithstanding. Thus, the actor calling the audience member out is the one who is breaking the mood."

First of all, as AC126748 said, this is nonsense. As someone else said, the actor is himself distracted as well, and the performance suffers.

"Part of an actor's job is to deal with myriad distractions, both onstage and off, including the little red light in the front row. I don't think what Broderick did was proper. He should have talked to stage management, who can then deal with house management."

Who often can't or won't do a damn thing, and often cause a much greater disturbance when they do try. When an actor calls out the miscreant, right then and right there, the problem is SOLVED. No trying to figure out who it is, trying to quietly get to them as they try to hide equipment and deny their wrong-doing. The problem is over, the law-breaker busted on the spot.

If you don't have the capacity to get yourself back into the performance after that, maybe live theater simply isn't for you.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Jordan Catalano 2013-02-21 11:19:18


What's that thing they teach you in actressing school about dealing with distracting things on stage and still going on with the performance? You know, where they teach you that no matter what happens, the show must go on?

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by yankeefan7 2013-02-21 11:24:31


Jordon Catalano - Understand what you are saying, my daughters have danced their whole lives and were taught that early on also. That being said, I think a Broadway star calling out a audience member will definitely put a stop to it quicker than a House usher. I have seen examples where audience member was told to stop and started doing the same thing minutes later. I feel bad for the rest of the audience but maybe if this happened more often the jerks would stop.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Jordan Catalano 2013-02-21 11:28:33


Didn't nobody pay $100 to see no damn Ferris Bueller yell at somebody. (But on the bright side, it was probably nice to see him actually looking like he was awake for 2 minutes onstage).

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by winston89 2013-02-21 11:52:54


The reason why I feel that it is unprofessional is because the part of the actor is to be able to take a moment, regroup and continue with the show when these things happen. I am not at all saying it's easy. But, that's why they are on the other side of the footlights.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Reginald Tresilian 2013-02-21 11:58:17


It sounds like that's what he did do--only first, he dealt directly with the problem.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by ghostlight2 2013-02-21 12:03:53


"Didn't nobody pay $100 to see no damn Ferris Bueller yell at somebody. (But on the bright side, it was probably nice to see him actually looking like he was awake for 2 minutes onstage)."

Your parenthetical tells me you're probably trolling more than being serious, but I have been to a lot of performances where actors have stopped shows for badly behaving audience members, and the response from the rest of the audience has always been overwhelmingly positive.

"The reason why I feel that it is unprofessional is because the part of the actor is to be able to take a moment, regroup and continue with the show when these things happen. "

Problem is, Winston, is that often these things often don't stop happening, so it's a constant distraction - and, it's STILL illegal! Why are the actors getting blamed for stopping an illegal action? The front of house can't always handle this. They haven't seen the true disrupter, the law-breaker, but the actor can, and can stop the action instantly.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by winston89 2013-02-21 12:09:17


The reason why actors yelling at the audience bugs me, is because legal or not, it is a minor infraction. In a technical sense, jaywalking in NYC is against the law but no one enforces it. Should I yell at someone the next time I see them jaywalking when I'm out and about in NYC?

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by mc1227 2013-02-21 12:11:02


I would be curious to see how the audience that night reacted to that. They may not have even realized it wasn't part of the show until minutes later? I'm a bit surprised at the staff at the Imperial who normally don't miss too much. They are constantly telling people they can't take pics of the curtain prior to the start of the show, which never ceases to amaze me.

I think Broderick did the right thing calling out the person. For those who feel that broke the mood or distracted them from the story, I think that it may take a couple of minutes to rebound from that, but it shouldn't be that hard in this show since it's a comedy musical. If the other actors recovered from it, the audience should be able to as well.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by ghostlight2 2013-02-21 12:11:51


^^^

This. If the actor can get back into the scene, why can't the audience? The actor has a hell of a lot more invested than the audience does. When I've seen actors stop shows like this, I have never seen an audience react in any other way but cheers and applause.

As to Winston's bizarre jaywalking example, I'd say, sure, go ahead and yell at them, if their actions are inhibiting your work.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by winston89 2013-02-21 14:52:13


If I spend my hard earned money and see a show, and this happens, I'd talk to the house manager and either try for a refund or to get my ticket past dated. Reason being is that I didn't pay to see an actor yell at the audience. I paid to see the show, and clearly yelling at one audience member isn't in the script or part of the show.

The thing is that there are many people who go to the theatre, hate the usage of cell phones, yet use it themselves. For example, I remember being at a performance of Time Stands Still. It was there that a guy sitting next to me got a little annoyed (rightfully so and not over the top in any way) about a someone's phone going off. However, this is the same person, that took out his phone to text during the middle of the second act.

And, Ghostlight, the whole "yelling at someone if what they are doing is bothering you/getting in your way" is just plain silly. It's about maturity and being the grown up in the situation. Sure, the person filming is in the wrong, no doubt about it. But, acting like a child when you're a grown man doing a show is sad and pathetic .

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by BroadwayFan12 2013-02-21 15:01:51


I could rant forever about the lack of theatre etiquette these days, but what Broderick, LuPone, etc. have done is equally bad, IMO. It's the actor's job not to break the fourth wall unless the show calls for it. Calling out bad behavior by behaving badly yourself is hypocritical, like parents who spank their children for hitting their siblings. The ushers need to be more alert and proactive, and the audiences need to learn to behave themselves. If an actor must say something, I think they should wait until curtain call. I know most will disagree with me, but it's just my two cents.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Reginald Tresilian 2013-02-21 15:02:33


But, Winston, clearly not everyone agrees with you that Broderick's stopping the show was "acting like a child." You're welcome to that interpretation, but it's not the only valid one.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by ghostlight2 2013-02-21 15:05:49


"Ghostlight, the whole "yelling at someone if what they are doing is bothering you/getting in your way" is just plain silly. It's about maturity and being the grown up in the situation. Sure, the person filming is in the wrong, no doubt about it. But, acting like a child when you're a grown man doing a show is sad and pathetic ."

Winston, you don't get it. It's not about "bothering you/getting in your way", it's about interfering with your job - and it's still about breaking the law. The actor is not the only person affected by these selfish people who film and photograph. The people near the photographer are affected. The entire audience is affected by the way the actor is affected. In cases of flash photography, it can be downright dangerous,

You say you never have been in an audience when this has happened. I have, many times. The audience has always overwhelmingly been in favor of the the actor's actions. Until you've actually experienced it, it's perhaps best you wait until you have to express how you feel.

eta: "Calling out bad behavior by being badly [sic] yourself is hypocritical, like parents who spank their children for hitting their siblings. The ushers need to be more alert and proactive, and the audiences need to learn to behave themselves. If an actor must say something, I think they should wait until curtain call. I know most will disagree with me, but it's just my two cents."

The ushers cannot always see what the actors can. The actors can stop bad behavior and have the law-breakers thrown out on the spot. The idea of an actor saying something at the curtain call after the fact is simply absurd. What purpose would that possibly serve?

Otherwise - what Reg said.



Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by BroadwayFan12 2013-02-21 15:25:34


It could serve as a warning to others. Public humiliation does that. In any case I doubt we'll change each other's minds, so I'll agree to disagree.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Phyllis Rogers Stone 2013-02-21 15:35:43


I mean, they're both really just pulling a Katharine Hepburn, since she called out someone taking pictures in the audience during one of her performances ages ago (West Side Waltz, I think? I remember reading about it an old old Playbill, but I can't find any info online).

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Reginald Tresilian 2013-02-21 15:40:37


And if Stritch is to be believed, the Great Kate was pulling a Merman.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Jane2 2013-02-21 15:41:01


" If the front of house staff isn't doing their job, someone has to. "

Um, just for your future reference, Ghostlight - Broderick addressing the issue does NOT mean the front of house isn't doing their job. For how many years have you been working front of house?

If you knew anything about foh, you might realize that approaching a patron in the front row involves making your way to the front row, already disturbing many patrons, then either trying to get the patron's attention by standing and motioning, and here you are standing right in front of the stage for all to see, or god forbid shining a flashlight on them, and asking them to stop, is more disturbing than the guy taking pictures.And this can all take place IF the patron is still taking pictures. They have uncanny speed in hiding cameras these days.

It was Broderick's decision to do what he did.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by ghostlight2 2013-02-21 15:56:24


Might be best to read all of the posts before you go on the attack, Jane. I don't work front of house the way you do, but I know many who do, and I don't envy them their position.

I accidently left out the word "able" in my first post, Jane (which I thank you for pointing out and will now edit), but if you go back and read the rest of my posts, I've said EVERYTHING that you've just said, many times over.

It's easier and less disruptive for an actor to stop this behavior than it is for the staff to do. Re-read my posts. I'm on your side, darlin'. I know your job isn't an easy one.





Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Kad 2013-02-21 19:33:57


And if an usher did try to stop it, I'm sure we'd get a new post on BWW about how DARE an usher distract from the performance.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by South Fl Marc 2013-02-21 22:59:09


First, I can't imagine why anyone would want to record another of Matthews horrible performances.

Second, if Matthew hadn't called the audience member out for taping the show, would anyone know they were doing it? He should have told an usher not stopped the show. But hey, he needs the publicity. His wife brings home the real money now. His only appeal is he once did Ferris Bueller. .

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by LesWickedly 2013-02-21 23:08:47


I know it's rude of the audience member but it's also rude of Matthew to break character and very unprofessional

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by winston89 2013-02-21 23:28:05


I just came home from seeing The Who (amazing concert by the way) and before the show, they made an announcement saying that Roger Daltry is allergic to cigarette smoke and to not smoke in the arena. This got the crowd to boo the announcement. However, towards the end of the show, Roger made a comment about how someone's smoke was bothering him and how he understood the need to get stoned, but said that they should stick to brownies. The audience cheered.

The point and connection to what Matthew did is that people are going to be more forgiving/entertained when the star yells at someone in the audience verses when the house staff does. In both situations someone was doing something that they shouldn't have done. But, since people put rock stars and Broadway stars (after all, there haven't been any stories of chorus girl number 8 yelling at someone in the audience) on a pedestal, they feel that they can do no wrong.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by ghostlight2 2013-02-22 00:47:17


Winston, almost none of that makes sense. Daltrey was a HUGE pot smoker, but it's tobacco he apparently has issues with - and eating tobacco is a very bad idea.

Your point/connection is lost on me. First of all, I don't put celebrities on pedestals - and if others do, where then is the problem if actors address photographers etc in the audience directly, if the audience approves the action? Seems here you're the odd man out -and as per your own words, you haven't even experienced this situation yet.

How do you truly know how you will react?

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by morosco 2013-02-22 09:06:17


Aren't there any bootlegs of Broderick chastising the audience member for bootlegging?

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by winston89 2013-02-22 11:31:11


Ghostlight, I wasn't clear because I was tired when making the post. However, despite the fact that Daltrey was a smoker, he has since stopped and has become allergic to the smell of smoke, both tobacco and pot. He has joked in concerts, that he understands the desire to get stoned but wishes that people would stick to pot brownies rather than a joint in order to do that.

The point that I was trying to make, is that the fans were booing when a member of the house staff got on the PA system and told people to not smoke, but for some reason when Roger himself gave the same message it suddenly became okay and got a different reaction from the crowd that was given the same message. I was trying to say that people view Broadway stars or rock stars differently then they do house staff and view them as people that can do no wrong. However, I am sure that some people were cheering Mathew because it was fun to watch him freak out while others actually agreed with what he was saying.

As for how I would react in this situation. Well, I was raised to believe that there are some things that you just flat out don't do. Things that you cannot justify no matter how hard you try. An example of this is that if you're a parent, you don't lay a hand on your child regardless of what is going on. You just don't. To me, stopping the show for a selfish reason (I am not caring about the minor legal infraction that bootlegging is) is something that you just flat out don't do. Grow up, have a pair and deal with it. If someone is doing something that is bothering you and you don't like, you take the high road always. And, I am not the only one in this thread who thought that what Matthew did was wrong either.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by ghostlight2 2013-02-22 12:14:39


" I was raised to believe that there are some things that you just flat out don't do. "

You were raised to never chastise an audience member who is taking photos or using a phone during a perfprmance?

"I was trying to say that people view Broadway stars or rock stars differently then they do house staff and view them as people that can do no wrong. "

What people? I don't think "stars" can do no wrong, and I don't think the vast majority of people do, either. Of course audiences are going to respond differently to an invisible authoritarian voice denying them something, rather than a rock star joking with them about it it, especially about something "naughty" like marijuana brownies. Besides, if I take the point you are trying to make, it actually makes mine: most people (aside from you and a couple others here) would applaud an actor doing what Matthew did.

As to Matthew stopping the show for a "selfish" reason, legality aside (and personally, I'm neutral on the subject of bootlegging), it's distracting, not just to him, but to the other actors and the people around the bootlegger. From the moment the camera is spotted, it can't help but affect the actor's choices, knowing that it's being filmed - and that affects me, even if I'm in the balcony.

The filmer is in the wrong. The actor is in the right, both morally and legally. Take your own advice " Grow up, have a pair and deal with it. If someone is doing something that is bothering you and you don't like [sic], you take the high road always."

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Mister Matt 2013-02-22 12:58:29


Good for Broderick! I didn't hear any of you bitches complaining when the Doobie Brothers stopped their concert because they saw the tape recorder fall out of Rerun's coat.

The reason why actors yelling at the audience bugs me, is because legal or not, it is a minor infraction.

That sort of thinking infuriates me even more. One of the main reasons it happens so often is the idea that it's a petty formality and no big deal.

If I spend my hard earned money and see a show, and this happens, I'd talk to the house manager and either try for a refund or to get my ticket past dated. Reason being is that I didn't pay to see an actor yell at the audience. I paid to see the show, and clearly yelling at one audience member isn't in the script or part of the show.

None of which wouldn't have happened if it weren't for the behavior of the audience member. Personally, I'd pay EXTRA to have the cast humiliate audience members who feel they are above the rules and insist on distracting everyone else including the cast.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Marianne2 2013-02-22 14:11:03


I don't see how an actor calling out an audience member for doing something illegal and wrong is immature. If the actor broke character to make fun of an audience member for no reason, you have a good argument there. Maybe I'm just that type of person, but I would certainly be more embarrassed and ashamed to be called out by anyone on a stage versus an usher.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by millie_dillmount 2013-02-22 23:06:48


I disagree with the people on here calling Broderick an "unprofessional" because of how he chose to handle the situation. I've been to many performances where people are recording or taking pictures during the show. No matter how many pre-show announcements, signs around the theater or warnings on your ticket there are, there is always someone doing it.

Unfortunately, an usher doesn't always see this. It doesn't mean they aren't doing their job, because when they do catch someone, they will stop them. So maybe Broderick breaking the fourth wall wasn't the most ideal way of handling it in your eyes, but hell, I'm sure it got the audience's attention. And just because you don't see the light on the cell phone or camera doesn't mean someone else isn't distracted by it. So, no, he wasn't unprofessional, but was merely trying to knock some sense into people who can't listen to the pre-show announcement or read "NO RECORDING DEVICES."

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by sparrman 2013-02-23 00:45:32


I'm baffled here by people's perceptions of the magnitude of various actions. Is taping a performance wrong? Yes. Is it illegal? Yes. Can it be distracting to the actors onstage? Yes. Can it be distracting to other audience members? Yes.

But...does that mean an actor should stop performing, completely destroy the world we're all there conspiring together to believe in, and completely distract every single person in the theatre just because they're annoyed by a little red light in the audience? Absolutely not. It's ridiculous, childish, and unprofessional.

What about audiences coughing? Candy wrapper crinkling? Someone leaving to go to the bathroom? A fellow actor going up on a line? A missed lighting cue? All perfectly good reasons for an actor to disrupt the show, because they got "distracted"?

There are methods in place for taking care of the videotaping problem. Are they perfect? No. But is videotaping a dangerous problem that simply must be stopped at any cost? Of course not.

An actor should stop the show for reasons of safety only. Otherwise, do your job, and stop ruining it for everyone in the theatre.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by ghostlight2 2013-02-23 01:14:16


"What about audiences coughing? Candy wrapper crinkling? Someone leaving to go to the bathroom? A fellow actor going up on a line? A missed lighting cue? All perfectly good reasons for an actor to disrupt the show, because they got "distracted"? "

These are all ridiculous examples and you know it. That "little red light" means a lot more than just the light - it means the performance is being recorded, which not only can make an actor self-conscious, it screws hundreds of people out of royalties.

"An actor should stop the show for reasons of safety only. Otherwise, do your job, and stop ruining it for everyone in the theatre."

Whose edicts are these? I'm going to say this one more time. I have been present many, many times when an actor has stopped a show for bad audience behavior (usually filming or photography). On every single one of these occasions, the audience has responded in an overwhelmingly positive manner. Applause, cheers "throw the bastard out" kind of thing.

You, Winston, and a few others in this thread are the odd men out. If an actor stopping a show to stop illegal, distracting and possibly dangerous behavior upsets you, fair enough. Go directly to the house manager and ask for a refund or past date. You'll probably get it, because no one else will be asking for it because they're loving every minute of it and will be dining out on it for years. It doesn't ruin it for them. It's live theater. Most people love when live theater goes awry.

Please, though, stop calling it "childish". Childish is a word that comes to mind when people complain that their fantasy worlds are temporarily interrupted by a professional who calls to task some ass that's not only breaking the law, but is keeping them from doing their job properly and disturbing others around them.

To be fair, even a child understands interruptions sometimes happen, and is able to rejoin the story without too much trouble. One would hope an adult ought to be able to as well without having these little verbal hissy fits. That's what I'd call selfish and childish.







Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by winston89 2013-02-23 03:29:22


So ghostlight let me see of I got this right. Me and others here who have a similar opinion as I do are the odd men out because we simply disagree with you? Because that makes logical sense. I mean we are entitled to differing opinions.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by sparrman 2013-02-23 08:30:48


Exactly. Ghostlight, as you are clearly incapable of carrying on a discussion without constantly disrupting it to personally attack those on the opposite side from you, I'm sure you have no objections whatsoever to Broderick's behavior.

Argue much? You almost never change the other person's mind. It's more about the process of exchanging ideas, trying to see things from the other side. "The journey, not the destination", that sort of thing. Not really so much repeating the same points over and over, insulting the great many "odd men out" who don't agree with you, and thinking everyone will suddenly say "You know what Ghostlight? You're right! You've convinced me with your infallible, airtight logic! What was I thinking?????"

Peace out, y'all.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by trentsketch 2013-02-23 09:23:38


I was raised to believe that breaking the law, such as illegally recording a Broadway show, is a bad thing. This was confirmed in the many IPR classes that I took in college explaining why it was illegal.

Furthermore, I have been onstage when people were illegally recording shows and it is a huge distraction. Your eye is drawn to the stupid bright light on the back of the camera or phone and it's a problem. The show must go on, true, but it's not fair to criticize someone in a very dance heavy show for looking out for the safety of his castmates. And it's not just a little red light. It's a very bright red light in a darkened auditorium. You can spot it easily from the stage but not as easily from the audience.

You want front of house to take care of it? Fine. When was the last time you flagged down an usher because the idiot next to you or near you was illegally recording the show or causing a distraction? In a Broadway house, there are very few ushers compared to audience members and they can't possibly catch anything. You want front of house to get the bootlegger thrown out of the audience? Then maybe you should make it a point to point out bootleggers to the usher and help them do their job. Actors don't always have the time in the wings or backstage to flag someone down to radio someone in the front of the house to figure out where in the audience the person is who the actor saw doing something bad. The FOH staff is doing the best they can but they can't catch everything. Want the actors to stop breaking the fourth wall and looking out for the safety of the cast and crew? Take an active role in performance and alert the ushers to distracting behavior.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by ghostlight2 2013-02-23 09:29:33


"So ghostlight let me see of [sic] I got this right. Me and others here who have a similar opinion as I do are the odd men out because we simply disagree with you? Because that makes logical sense. I mean we are entitled to differing opinions."

There is no right or wrong (except for the legal issue). You're entirely entitled to your opinions. Nope, you're the odd men out because, as Winston has admitted, he's never experienced this phenomena, and unless I missed it, neither have you, sparrman. I have, and have never once heard a single boo amongst the cheers and applause when an actor has stopped the show.

You think it's unprofessional and childish, go ahead and get your money back. Most of the rest of the audience will be applauding the actor for standing up for himself, his craft, and the rest of us.

"Ghostlight, as you are clearly incapable of carrying on a discussion without constantly disrupting it to personally attack those on the opposite side from you, I'm sure you have no objections whatsoever to Broderick's behavior."

No, I don't object to Broderick's behaviour, and since I've said so, that's obvious. I don't know why you're using the word "disrupting". You talk, then I talk. That's the way a discussion works. I can't possibly disrupt you in this forum. Also, what's all this talk about Broderick "yelling" and "freaking out"? Nothing in the article linked to mentions anything of that nature. He spoke to the guy and asked him to stop.

"You almost never change the other person's mind. It's more about the process of exchanging ideas, trying to see things from the other side. "The journey, not the destination", that sort of thing. Not really so much repeating the same points over and over,"

You mean like using the words "childish" "selfish" and "unprofessional" over and over? I and others here have given a myriad of reasons why Broderick - and Merman, LuPone, Fishburne, Alan Cumming, Hepburn and many others have done what they have - and you keep coming back with nothing but "selfish", "childish" and "unprofessional".

That exchange of ideas? It works both ways.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by iabwayfan 2013-02-23 10:20:19


I wonder if making the consequences a little more harsh, such as immediate removal from the theater would help. I'm new to NYC and Broadway shows. I've only been going the past 6 years and can see an increase in poor patron behaviors in that short time span.

Could there be more blunt signs and warnings on the tickets? I know this part is my problem, but it makes me really uncomfortable when I'm seated near someone taking pictures.

There are many first timers who don't know all the etiquette, but people, LISTEN to the pre-show announcements!

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Kad 2013-02-23 10:41:14


Removing an audience member from the theatre would be far more disruptive than an actor embarrassing them. And, I'd wager, a good number of audience members asked to leave would not do so willingly.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Marianne2 2013-02-23 11:07:18


If a video camera light or a flash from a camera were to put an actor's life in danger, then yes, it should be stopped immediately. Just because you don't think it is, doesn't mean it isn't.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Reginald Tresilian 2013-02-23 12:27:25


Why are so many pretending that ghostlight is the only one who feels this way? Read the thread: a number of people side with ghostlight (and Broderick). I'm one of them.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by TheatreDiva90016 2013-02-23 13:33:36


Me too.

How would some of you feel in Matthew just turned around and walked off the stage?

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by winston89 2013-02-23 15:13:38


Reginald Tresilian

I know that Ghostlight is not the only one who feels this way. I personally am annoyed that he thinks that it is I who is the only one who's opinion differs with his. That is something that isn't the case at all.

And, for Ghostlight. You're changing your stories. First, you said that I was the odd man out for being the only one with the differing opinion form yours. And, then after I pointed out that there were others who agreed with me, you then changed it to me being the odd man out for never having been in the theatre when this has happened. Which one is it, Captain Flipflop?

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by BeadleDeedle 2013-02-23 15:47:08


Winston, did you seriously just call ghostlight "Captain Flipflop"? And you call a theater professional like Broderick childish?

Ghostlight and others have stated various supported and informed reasons for an actor to call out an audience member for filming. Its illegal and can be very dangerous. Your reasoning is emotional, knee jerky and all about you you YOU. Theater is a collective experience. Broderick has command of the room. He was absolutely in the right.

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by ghostlight2 2013-02-23 16:14:09


Bravo(a), BeedleDeedle!

Captain FlipFlop? That's your attempt at an insult, Winston?

I haven't changed my stories. First I said "Seems here you're the odd man out - and as per your own words, you haven't even experienced this situation yet. "

Then, to sparrman, I said: "Nope, you're the odd men out because, as Winston has admitted, he's never experienced this phenomena, and unless I missed it, neither have you, sparrman." I merely added sparrman to the list, which changed "odd man" to "odd men" as a result. No flip-flop. Plus, on an informal tally of this thread, more support Broderick's actions than not.

Obviously many people disagree with me, many in this thread, but some of them at least have had the experience, which you and sparrman (and here I assume) have not, and thus have never experienced the overwhelming positive audience reaction.

Hell, Listen to LuPone's audio. The audience loves it. IF this ever happens to you, AND you don't approve, just ask for your money back.

Taking photos or filming is inarguably illegal. It is unquestionably distracting. It is quite often, in the case of flash photography, dangerous. It is disrespectful to the actors and fellow patrons. You've heard from many others in this thread, most making various cases FOR actors doing this and giving you the reasons why.

The best you've come up with is selfish, childish, and unprofessional - ALL of which are arguable points.

I don't know why you continue to pursue this discussion with such ardor, attacking me specifically, unless it's because you still harbor ill-will towards me for pointing out that Andy Borowitz story you published as an actual news article as the satire that it truly is some time ago - because if that's the reason, you should really get over it.



Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by TheatreDiva90016 2013-02-23 16:31:05


How would some of you feel in Matthew just turned around and walked off the stage?

Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by Auggie27 2013-02-23 17:56:05


Whatever side(s) one comes down on with this issue, there's a considerable difference in the impact at NICE WORK and in the final, heart-stopping moments of VIRGINIA WOOLF. Had either Letts or Morton stepped outside George and Martha, particularly in their ultimate or penultimate show downs, the play would've been ruined. And they wisely, intuitively, know that. Broderick is in a musical comedy, an enormous portion of his performance presentational, pitched toward the audience. Of course it's distracting for him to break character. But returning to the stylized world of singing and dancing rum runners is very different from stepping back inside George and Martha's living room. One can stand by a preference for actor behavior, but there's no denying that the suspension of disbelief is a very different leap for audiences attending these 2 shows with little or nothing in common.







Broderick pulls a Lupone?
Posted by BeadleDeedle 2013-02-23 19:42:08


^^^ VERY good point auggie