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Member Name: luvtheEmcee
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Gender: Female
Favorite Show(s): Chicago

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Most Recent Message Board Posts:
  • Kelli O'Hara interview with The Interval  Apr 16 2015, 01:04:01 PM

    It's opening night so you should read this interview. :)

  • Kelli O'Hara interview with The Interval  Apr 13 2015, 04:23:12 PM

    Just me with a signal boost, because this is worth reading

  • Fun Home Previews  Apr 2 2015, 04:07:03 PM

    You guys should read this: http://the-interval.com/ints/jt/


    There's a bunch of material about Fun Home, but the whole thing is terrific. 

  • Side Show: Added Attractions Live at 54 Below CD announced  Mar 10 2015, 03:12:07 PM
    I might've posted this in another thread about Erin or Side Show, but I can't remember, and it's a pretty great piece, so I wanted to share (again?) for those who are interested. Some friends of mine are behind this new website, and they have a wonderfully in-depth interview with Erin about Side Show, amongst many other things: http://the-interval.com/ints/ed/
  • Cabaret understudy  Feb 2 2015, 06:59:32 PM
    This is my favorite production of all-time. I'll never find the right words for how much I love it. Alan is magnificent, no doubt, but the production is more than its lead actor, and it will be tremendous and worth seeing with or without him. It'll be a bummer to miss him, certainly, but if your options are to see a masterpiece without him now or not to see it at all, the choice seems clear. Go.
  • THE INVISIBLE HAND at NYTW  Dec 15 2014, 01:11:54 PM
    It's a little over 2 hours.

    I saw it in previews and liked it. I haven't seen Disgraced yet so I can't compare, but on its own I thought it was pretty solid. And it's always great to see Justin Kirk, who really, really needs to do more theater.
  • Cabaret question (contains a spoiler)  Dec 15 2014, 01:05:15 PM
    In many cases, stage directions are published/printed largely for the benefit of the reader in the play's lifetime as a piece of on-the-page literature. They're taken from the original stage manager's notes, and are a record of what was done in the original production. Largely. They're not necessarily binding for subsequent directors, though of course there are exceptions.

    That said, I've seen productions of the new script of Cabaret that stage the ending completely differently than
  • Why has Megan hilty not played velma or roxie in chiago  Dec 9 2014, 02:33:47 PM
    Maybe because she has better things to do than be the 87th replacement in an exhausted long-running production?
  • PRETTY WOMAN Musical Being Developed  Dec 9 2014, 02:32:20 PM
    Why.
  • Wall Street Journal writer admits to leaving most shows at intermission...  Dec 9 2014, 02:29:20 PM
    She's not doing her job. If she's there, as an invited guest, with comped press tickets, and she's writing about it, she'd better sit through the whole show. End of story. The public's impression of your review is that, regardless of content, it was reviewed fairly with all "information," for lack of a better term. Information being, you know, the entire performance.

    I wouldn't suggest someone in her position lose his/her job for poorly reviewing shows watched in their entirety. Th
  • ALLEGRO at Classic Stage Company  Nov 12 2014, 01:49:54 PM
    According to this interview, CSC gave Doyle freedom to choose a show, and he chose Allegro:

    http://92yondemand.org/rodgers-hammersteins-allegro-conversation-performance/
  • Cabaret--Bar Rail Obstructed View  Nov 8 2014, 02:59:45 PM
    How much are they going for now? The view is fine.
  • ALLEGRO at Classic Stage Company  Nov 8 2014, 11:26:28 AM
    Technically it was a regional budget, and Cincinnati Playhouse commissioned it because they liked the idea. Whether it was always intended to go to Broadway and that was a tryout in disguise, I don't know (I don't think so), and I'm not sure if you do either or you're just assuming. There were, of course, differences in the budget between the two productions. There was an article on it somewhere, once upon a time, but it mostly focused on how Raul's suit got fancier.
  • ALLEGRO at Classic Stage Company  Nov 7 2014, 04:58:58 PM
    Aww, thank you.
  • ALLEGRO at Classic Stage Company  Nov 7 2014, 03:38:47 PM
    Well, yeah, the financial constraints created the need for some kind of solution. Granted, that solution could have literally been exactly what you perceive it to have been: actors standing around with instruments for no reason. Instead, he found a way to turn it into something with meaning, although you think he didn't. And we'll never know if, maybe, someone would have tried it anyway without the financial impetus. It isn't that crazy of an idea.

    I'm not personally insulted. i just d
  • ALLEGRO at Classic Stage Company  Nov 7 2014, 02:59:10 PM
    Thank you. I should hope so. I spent a long time studying John's work and I know that production inside out. Company is really solid in many ways, but it's also problematic in others. I see where the complaints about it come from. I don't share them, but I understand.

    I'm sensing that you don't know the background of the actor-musicians on the commercial American stage, so, briefly: John first directed Sweeney at the Watermill, a small theatre in the UK. They didn't have the budg
  • ALLEGRO at Classic Stage Company  Nov 7 2014, 02:32:19 PM
    While I disagree with you that his Company was not funny (I found it quite funny, but I also know it was much darker than what many people who knew Company before it were used to -- his was my first Company), I promise you it was not the instruments that made it un-funny. It's interesting to me, when people think the instruments were the only thing he did as a director. There was so much more there. You don't have to like it, I don't care, but at least acknowledge that he's capable of setting a
  • ALLEGRO at Classic Stage Company  Nov 7 2014, 02:16:06 PM
    I meant to mention the Mendes Cabaret in my previous post. But again, it doesn't seem to qualify with what's (actually) being asked here, since it's integrated into the storytelling differently. I think the issue is how realistic it is in a show where the characters are musicians as opposed to something that's imposed on the piece and woven into the way the story is being told: music therapy in Sweeney, if that's what you saw, and the big "join the band" metaphor that ran through Company.
  • ALLEGRO at Classic Stage Company  Nov 7 2014, 01:42:26 PM
    Nobody's saying it's common, we're just saying it's not exclusive to Doyle's work. Or, for that matter, to his big-name work that's been done in the U.S. He did it before Sweeney, too. It was hardly his trademark and he's directed most of his work without it, but he had done it before here and there. There's an excellent interview that spans much of the history of his career, however it wasn't in print; it was a panel he did, moderated by Jack Cummings III, with Mano Felciano and Mary-Mitchell C
  • ALLEGRO at Classic Stage Company  Nov 6 2014, 10:41:28 AM
    I might be the biggest proponent of John Doyle's actor-musician work in the world outside of the people who are actually employed by its existence. So I'm pretty excited about this, and grateful the run falls during a time when I'll be in town.

    That being said, the last actor-musician show of his I saw was his Merrily re-boot out in Cincinnati, and I liked it very much. But, I did feel the concept only had moments where it worked as strongly as it has in the past, and that this was