Amelia Reynolds

Amelia Reynolds Amelia Reynolds has been writing for BroadwayWorld.com since 2015. Born and raised in Wilmington, Delaware of all places (home to Joe Biden, Aubrey Plaza and John Gallagher Jr.), Amelia Reynolds has lived and breathed theater since she was young. Having taken in the theater scenes from Philadelphia and New York City, she now resides on a new coast in Seattle, where she sees as much theater as she can. Graduating from Ithaca College with a B.A. in Journalism with a minor in Theater, Reynolds has written arts coverage for Whitewall Magazine, The Ithacan, Buzzsaw Magazine, and Ithaca Week.


MOST POPULAR ARTICLES
LAST 30 DAYS

BWW Review: Seattle Musical Theatre's KISS ME, KATE Not Tongue-In-Cheek EnoughBWW Review: Seattle Musical Theatre's KISS ME, KATE Not Tongue-In-Cheek Enough
Posted: Apr. 11, 2017


BWW Review: A Cerebral Tribute to Freaky, Fringe Theatre with Copious Love's THE FOG MACHINE PLAYBWW Review: A Cerebral Tribute to Freaky, Fringe Theatre with Copious Love's THE FOG MACHINE PLAY
Posted: Apr. 4, 2017


LAST 365 DAYS

BWW Review: Seattle Children's Theatre's THE LION, THE WITCH, AND THE WARDROBE: A Sprint Through NarniaBWW Review: Seattle Children's Theatre's THE LION, THE WITCH, AND THE WARDROBE: A Sprint Through Narnia
Posted: Oct. 24, 2016


BWW Review: Effortful SPRING AWAKENING at 12th Ave Arts Suffers From Technical DifficultiesBWW Review: Effortful SPRING AWAKENING at 12th Ave Arts Suffers From Technical Difficulties
Posted: Jul. 27, 2016


BWW Review: Young Stars Perform with Aplomb in Village Theatre's BILLY ELLIOTBWW Review: Young Stars Perform with Aplomb in Village Theatre's BILLY ELLIOT
Posted: May. 25, 2016


BWW Review: Seattle Musical Theatre's KISS ME, KATE Not Tongue-In-Cheek EnoughBWW Review: Seattle Musical Theatre's KISS ME, KATE Not Tongue-In-Cheek Enough
Posted: Apr. 11, 2017


BWW Review: Ghost Light Theatrics' THE BIG BAD is Brechtian, Bloody, and BreathtakingBWW Review: Ghost Light Theatrics' THE BIG BAD is Brechtian, Bloody, and Breathtaking
Posted: Nov. 11, 2016


BWW Review: Theatre Schmeater's Toast TWILIGHT ZONE: LIVE! Turns Twenty-Four, Still Got ItBWW Review: Theatre Schmeater's Toast TWILIGHT ZONE: LIVE! Turns Twenty-Four, Still Got It
Posted: Nov. 25, 2016


BWW Review: Seattle Public Theater's THE LIAR: Effervescent and GroovyBWW Review: Seattle Public Theater's THE LIAR: Effervescent and Groovy
Posted: Feb. 6, 2017


BWW Review: Reboot Theater's PRIVATE LIVES Very Witty, Slightly WonkyBWW Review: Reboot Theater's PRIVATE LIVES Very Witty, Slightly Wonky
May 9, 2017

Elyot (Kit Lascher) and Sybil (Alysha Curry) are on honeymoon in the French Riviera. It's 1930. They're sipping cocktails, calling each other 'dahling' in that quintessential, leftover-from-Britain way of speaking. Sybil has already mentioned Elyot's ex wife, Amanda, but Elyot reassures Sybil that she has nothing to worry about.

BWW Review: Café Nordo's 'Twin Peaks' Homage LOST FALLS Bites Off More Than It Can Chew
April 26, 2017

Something as stylized as 'Twin Peaks' is really difficult to emulate, even in the form of homage. Cafe Nordo's 'Lost Falls' certainly looks the part: a rustic, log hotel from yesteryear populated by a sultry, young femme fatale, a woman with an imaginary friend, an unwaveringly optimistic detective with an affinity for the simpler things. The play looks the part, but the commitment to incorporating so many iconic nuances created a jam-packed tribute with little cohesiveness. Audience members need not feel required to have seen 'Twin Peaks' to enjoy the show, but it helps make sense of the surreal parody, because, unfortunately, the plot does not stand on its own.

BWW Review: Seattle Musical Theatre's KISS ME, KATE Not Tongue-In-Cheek EnoughBWW Review: Seattle Musical Theatre's KISS ME, KATE Not Tongue-In-Cheek Enough
April 11, 2017

If you have to preface your show with the acknowledgement of misogyny, is showcasing the choreography and vocal talent worth putting on that show?

BWW Review: A Cerebral Tribute to Freaky, Fringe Theatre with Copious Love's THE FOG MACHINE PLAYBWW Review: A Cerebral Tribute to Freaky, Fringe Theatre with Copious Love's THE FOG MACHINE PLAY
April 4, 2017

What an inside joke this one was! 'The Fog Machine Play' is a very smart toast to Seattle fringe theatre written and produced by a Seattle fringe theatre company, Copious Love Productions.

BWW Review: A Warm Cup of T with YANKEE PICKNEY at Theater SchmeaterBWW Review: A Warm Cup of T with YANKEE PICKNEY at Theater Schmeater
March 14, 2017

"Yankee Pickney" is a dynamic relic, a precious time capsule of diaries, photographs, poems, and stories aboutJehansanyin's complicated relationship with her identity, primarily her racial and ethnic identity. She talks about how her relationship to her race and ethnicity fluctuated depending on where she lived, whether it be in Hershey, Pennsylvania, the Virgin Islands, or on her Semester at Sea trip to Africa. The title of the production itself references her complex identity, as the term comes from the nickname sanyin's grandparent would call her, meaning Americanized child. sanyin mourns the death of her best friend, and discusses how systematic racism has impacted her personally.

BWW Review: SHLONG SONG Has Cojones at 18th and UnionBWW Review: SHLONG SONG Has Cojones at 18th and Union
February 7, 2017

The most common subject in comedy is sex. But Woody Shticks (brainchild of Noah Duffy and star of 18th and Union's 'Shlong Song') is not just a comedian, he's a dynamic storyteller. It's a man talking about his sexual journey. At times, it's heartbreaking. At other times, it's fantastic. Either way, you'll laugh along with him.

BWW Review: Seattle Public Theater's THE LIAR: Effervescent and GroovyBWW Review: Seattle Public Theater's THE LIAR: Effervescent and Groovy
February 6, 2017

Modern adaptations of traditional texts are common, but mod adaptations of traditional texts are quite rare.Seattle Public Theater's 'The Liar' puts a60s twist on a 17th-century farce, and it works.

BWW Review: Lopsided Tone in Farcical MY MAN GODFREY at Theatre SchmeaterBWW Review: Lopsided Tone in Farcical MY MAN GODFREY at Theatre Schmeater
February 3, 2017

Something's wrong when a tertiary character with no name upstages your main character. Sometimes it can make a production more memorable, but in Theatre Schmeater's current production of 'My Man Godfrey', the nameless mediator embraced the melodrama of the production and went over the top deliciously. This person, Danny Herter, set the bar very high for the level of pomp and circumstance that some of the flighty aristocrats just did not match. Granted, the bulk of the cast did a good job making the characters into caricatures--Sarah Karnes' whiney Irene Bullock; Lantz Wagner as the mooching eccentric, Carlo; and Teri Lazzara's ditzy Angelica Bullock, to name a few (more on that later)--but I wish director Doug Staley pointed to Danny Herter, with his Martin Short as the Mad Hatter voice, and encouraged the less flamboyant members of the cast to peacock a bit more in this tale of scatterbrained socialites.

BWW Review: 18th and Union's Feminist Sketch Comedy HAPPY HOUR Has PotentialBWW Review: 18th and Union's Feminist Sketch Comedy HAPPY HOUR Has Potential
February 3, 2017

Who am I to judge how anyone processes the political climate? Well, when it's theatre, technically, it's my job. Nonetheless, I understand why Keira McDonald and Erin Stewart put on their two-woman sketch comedy, 'Happy Hour', now performing at 18th and Union as a part of their 'Oddballs and Misfits' series (along with 'Oroboro', among others). These two performers set out to process their feelings on the day of the inauguration through impersonations (Kate Mullgrew, Shelley Winters); multiple scenes in doctors' offices with circumstances so ridiculous, you'd hope they'd be satirical; and a rap about Susan B. Anthony. From the clear-as-day reading from a script in the wings, to the faulty mics, to the rudimentary PowerPoint as background graphics, the collective felt (though full of heart) a little thrown-together. Some sketches outshined others, and although the production felt effortful and honest, 'Happy Hour' felt a touch unpolished.

BWW Review: Absurdist Comedy OROBORO More Unsettling Than Funny at 18th and UnionBWW Review: Absurdist Comedy OROBORO More Unsettling Than Funny at 18th and Union
January 30, 2017

Conceptual productions are tricky because you have to find that balance of being cerebral and being entertaining, especially when you market yourself as a comedy. As apart of18th and Union's 'Oddballs and Misfits' series, Human sparkplug K. Brian Neel's 'Oroboro' is a one-man acid nightmare that shows off his performing skills, but the show gets too wrapped up in being conceptual to be funny.

BWW Review: Strawberry Theatre Workshop's PROOF Need Not Prove Its IntegrityBWW Review: Strawberry Theatre Workshop's PROOF Need Not Prove Its Integrity
January 26, 2017

Behold, a rare gem,apiece of art that combines two vastly different disciplines: theater, and math. Ironically, what makesDavid Auburn's Pulitzer Prize winning play, 'Proof' so entertaining isn't so much the math, but the chemistry between the characters. Get out your pens and pencils, students, because Strawberry Theatre Workshop's harmoniousperformances are noteworthy.

BWW Review: RSVP 'Yes' to Game-Changing MADAME DRAGON'S 60TH BIRTHDAY BASH at Café Nordo
January 16, 2017

It's easy to feel skeptical when young Sara Porkalob steps onto Cafe Nordo's stage and claims to be celebrating her sixtieth birthday. But with her effortless 'still-got-it' physicality and chutzpa, Porkalob became a believably spry sixty-years-young Madame Dragon. In her latest iteration of her one-woman show 'The Dragon Lady'--Porkalob's tribute to her gangstergrandma--'Madame Dragon's 60th Birthday' is an expansive and immersive tribute that tells Maria Porkalob's (aka Madame Dragon) stories of sex, murder and motherhood through spoken word, music, and food. This is not just dinner theatre. This is a party.

BWW Review: Theatre Schmeater's Toast TWILIGHT ZONE: LIVE! Turns Twenty-Four, Still Got ItBWW Review: Theatre Schmeater's Toast TWILIGHT ZONE: LIVE! Turns Twenty-Four, Still Got It
November 25, 2016

It's that time of the year again! Theatre Schmeater's 'Twilight Zone: Live!' celebrates its 24th birthday with three culturally pertinent episode adaptations. As a first timer with high expectations, the first few moments seeing my beloved Twilight Zone in color were jarring. This passes. In this perfect homage that clearly expresses reverence with just the right sprinkling of poking-fun, 'Twilight Zone: Live!' is a cozy, kooky production that continues to be as timeless as infinity.

BWW Review: Enjoy Childlike Wonder with Magical PETER AND THE STARCATCHER at ArtsWestBWW Review: Enjoy Childlike Wonder with Magical PETER AND THE STARCATCHER at ArtsWest
November 25, 2016

We get to be children again! Laugh at the fart jokes! Stare with wonder at the choreography! Giggle at the man playing an uptight Nanny! ArtsWest extends its hand, beckoning audience members to use their imagination in their delightful production of 'Peter and the Starcatcher.'

BWW Review: Ghost Light Theatrics' THE BIG BAD is Brechtian, Bloody, and BreathtakingBWW Review: Ghost Light Theatrics' THE BIG BAD is Brechtian, Bloody, and Breathtaking
November 11, 2016

Words truly cannot do Ghost Light Theatricals' 'The Big Bad' justice. The best analogy I can conjure: a feminist circus where the clowns rip their hearts out in solidarity. It's no surprise that this little gem won the 2016 Battle of the Bards.Directed by Eddie DeHais, the collective DangerSwitch! conceived and created this ten-course meal of theatrical storytelling, using dance, puppetry, clowning, shadow play, and varying physical styles to unpack the female experience.

BWW Review: Spooky THE LOST GIRLS at The Annex Theatre Misses Forest for TreesBWW Review: Spooky THE LOST GIRLS at The Annex Theatre Misses Forest for Trees
November 8, 2016

Quarter-life crisis is the new midlife crisis, and the characters in The Annex Theatre's 'The Lost Girls' are suffering. What's the point of spending so much on a college education in the liberal arts only to work at a summer camp and move back in with your parents? On top of the expectations of the modern woman, the expectations of the modern post-grad woman are grim.

BWW Review: A Predictable Sitcom with UNEXPECTED WILDERNESS at The Annex TheatreBWW Review: A Predictable Sitcom with UNEXPECTED WILDERNESS at The Annex Theatre
November 7, 2016

The Annex Theatre advertises their current production 'Unexpected Wilderness' to bea 'farcical romp'. I saw Jaryl Draper's show at The Annex, and I beg to differ.A farce is a madcap comedy where characters find themselves in extreme, exaggerated, ridiculous situations,and hilarity ensues. A ridiculous situation does not feel ridiculous if it's already been done dozens of times, in dozens of ways. Yes, this play uniquely showcases Bigfoot as a character, but beyond that, all the hijinks among those interacting with Bigfoot in the woods are painfully predictable, making 'Unexpected Wilderness' feel more like a formulaic sitcom.

BWW Review: Theatre22's Elaborate THE PRIDE Pulsates and PlodsBWW Review: Theatre22's Elaborate THE PRIDE Pulsates and Plods
November 3, 2016

In the opening scene of 'The Pride,' we immediately understand two things about the men on stage: they are British, and they are uncomfortable. It's 1958. Oliver says hello to Philip. The conversation is taught, small, and as light-hearted as two people 'with nothing in common' can muster. In this middle-class London home, it is not what these polite people say to one another, but what they don't say--or, perhaps, can't say--that drives Alexi Kaye Campbell's sentimental split-period piece. When Philip's wife says she feels something in the room, the light bulb in your head goes off, and the tension makes sense.

BWW Review: Seattle Children's Theatre's THE LION, THE WITCH, AND THE WARDROBE: A Sprint Through NarniaBWW Review: Seattle Children's Theatre's THE LION, THE WITCH, AND THE WARDROBE: A Sprint Through Narnia
October 24, 2016

C.S. Lewis' 1950 fantasy novel, 'The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe' has withstood the test of time, delighting generations of children and adults, religious and non-religious alike in book, film, and theatre form. Adrian Mitchell's musical adaptation of 'The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe' now performs at the Seattle Children's Theatre with a narrative faithfully streamlined from the original text. That very faithfulness certainly has its pro's with those familiar with the Christian allegory, but cramming every moment from the book into a two-hour musical made the story feel rushed. This is one aesthetically dazzling production that, as the adult, may require some explaining to the kids after the show.

BWW Review: Ibsen's GHOSTS at ArtsWest: A Haunting TriumphBWW Review: Ibsen's GHOSTS at ArtsWest: A Haunting Triumph
October 2, 2016

Henrik Ibsen's lesser-known drama 'Ghosts' should be just as prolific as 'A Doll's House.' This 19th-century societal criticism is one to check off your classical theater bucket list, and Richard Eyre's masterfuladaptation at ArtsWest is impressivelyclose to the original.On top of casting two theatrical powerhouses--Suzanna Bouchard and Noah Racey--ArtsWest's current production is one that would make Ibsen himself stand and applaud.



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