MET MUSEUM PRESENTS Announces Remaining 2012 Events

MET MUSEUM PRESENTS Announces Remaining 2012 Events

Performances

Friday, November 30, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

Live Webcast of Peony Pavilion

Updated Version by Tan Dun and Huang Doudou

Performed by Zhang Jun and the Shanghai Zhang Jun Art Center Company

in the Metropolitan Museum's Astor Court 

Saturday, December 1, 2012, at 2:00 and 7:00 p.m. – SOLD OUT

Sunday, December 2, 2012, at noon and 3:00 p.m. – SOLD OUT

Peony Pavilion

Updated Version by Tan Dun and Huang Doudou Performed by Zhang Jun and the Shanghai Zhang Jun Art Center Company in the Metropolitan Museum's Astor Court 

On Friday, November 30, The Metropolitan Museum of Art will offer a live webcast of the first of five performances of an updated version of the 16th-century Chinese Kunqu opera masterpiece Peony Pavilion that will take place in the Met's Astor Court, the courtyard modeled on a 17th-century Chinese garden.  This 70-minute version of the opera has been developed and directed by celebrated composer Tan Dun, with a new score by Mr. Tan and choreography by Huang Doudou, one of China's most prominent dancers.  It will be performed by Zhang Jun, one of China's most respected Kunqu performers, and the Shanghai Zhang Jun Art Center Company.

The webcast of the Friday, November 30, performance at 7:00 p.m. (not including the post-event presentation) will be live-streamed on the Met's website, www.metmuseum.org; see the event page for more information. The event will also be archived for later viewing.

Tickets are sold out for the five performances of the opera in The Astor Court (November 30 at 7:00 p.m.; December 1 at 2:00 and 7:00 p.m.; and December 2 at noon and 3:00 p.m.), but tickets are still available for a live, high-definition transmission of the first of the performances, on Friday, November 30, in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium.  Following the transmission, the company will make a brief onstage presentation in the auditorium.

Peony Pavilion is co-produced by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the US-China Cultural Institute. 

This program is made possible by an anonymous donor.  Additional support is provided by the China-United States Exchange Foundation, US-China Cultural Institute, China International Cultural Association, and the Tang Family Foundation (Bermuda).

Tickets for November 30 Transmission:  $15

Tuesday, November 27, 2012, at 6:30 & 8:30 p.m. in the Medieval Sculpture Hall

Sunday, December 2, 2012, at 6:30 & 8:30 p.m. in the Medieval Sculpture Hall

Chanticleer – Holiday Concert

The renowned vocal ensemble celebrates the mystery and wonder of Christmas with traditional carols, medieval and Renaissance sacred works, and new holiday music.

            Concerts in the Medieval Sculpture Hall are presented in front of the Museum's Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Crèche.  The exhibition of the crèche is made possible by gifts to The Christmas Tree Fund and the Loretta Hines Howard Fund.

On a 10-country tour in early 2012, Chanticleer returned to some of Europe's most renowned concert halls, including the Musikverein (Vienna), Bela Bartók Concert Hall (Budapest), Concertgebouw (Amsterdam), and Philharmonic Hall (Vilnius).  The season also included Chanticleer's performance on the soundtrack of the 10th-anniversary release by Microsoft of its legendary video game HALO, the ensemble's first live film score performance, and a return visit to six California missions with more newly discovered music of the period.  www.chanticleer.org

Tickets:  $70

Sunday, December 9, 2012, at 6:30 & 8:30 p.m. in the Medieval Sculpture Hall

Cathedral Choir of St. John the Divine led by Kent Tritle –

"O Magnum Mysterium: O Great Mystery" – Holiday Concert

Kent Tritle, Director of Music at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, leads the cathedral's choir  in "O Magnum Mysterium: O Great Mystery," a program featuring settings of the O Magnum Mysterium text by T.L. da Victoria, Morton Lauridsen, and Francis Poulenc; works by Byrd, Biebl, and Hassler; and music by contemporary American composer Eric Whitacre.

Concerts in the Medieval Sculpture Hall are presented in front of the Museum's Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Crèche.  The exhibition of the crèche is made possible by gifts to The Christmas Tree Fund and the Loretta Hines Howard Fund.

The Cathedral Choir of St. John the Divine leads the musical ministry at that sacred place.  Under the direction of Kent Tritle, Director of Cathedral Music and Organist, who was called "the brightest star in New York's choral music world" by the New York Times, the choir is made up of vocal professionals who enjoy careers in opera, oratorio, early music, and contemporary music and sing weekly for Sunday morning and Evensong services throughout the year.  The choir is also heard throughout the New York concert scene; recent performances included a special live broadcast from WQXR's Greene Space on the tenth anniversary of 9/11. 

Tickets:  $60

Tuesday, December 11, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. in the Medieval Sculpture Hall

Christopher Taylor, piano – Vingt regards sur l'enfant Jésus – Holiday Concert

Christopher Taylor will perform Messiaen's Vingt regards sur l'enfant-Jésus, a 1944 collection of short pieces, or "contemplations," on the figures present at the birth of Christ.  Of a recent performance of the work by Taylor, Mark Swed wrote in the Los Angeles Times, "Messiaen's mystical music invites out-of-body experiences. ... That was certainly the effect of Christopher Taylor's spellbinding performance of the work. ... he has found a way to make the piano sound as if it could levitate."

Concerts in the Medieval Sculpture Hall are presented in front of the Museum's Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Crèche.  The exhibition of the crèche is made possible by gifts to The Christmas Tree Fund and the Loretta Hines Howard Fund.

Among his generation of pianists, Christopher Taylor stands out as an innovative musician with a diverse array of talents and interests. During the past few years he has appeared regularly in many important concert halls and developed a loyal following throughout the United States and abroad; critics hail him as "one of the most impressive young pianists on the horizon today" (Washington Post) and "frighteningly talented" (New York Times). He is known for a passionate advocacy of music written in the past 100 years-Messiaen, Ligeti, and Bolcom figure prominently in his performances-but his repertoire spans four centuries and includes the complete Beethoven sonatas, the Liszt Transcendental Etudes, Bach'sGoldberg Variations, and a multitude of other familiar masterworks. Whatever the genre or era of the composition, Mr. Taylor is praised for bringing to it an active imagination and intellect coupled with heartfelt intensity and grace.  Christopher Taylor bio

Tickets:  $45

Thursday, December 13, 2012, at 6:30 & 8:30 p.m. in the Medieval Sculpture Hall

Alla Francesca – Thibaut de Champagne & le manuscrit du roi – Holiday Concert

Alla Francesca, the acclaimed early music group that is ensemble in residence at the Musée National du Moyen Âge (Musée de Cluny) in Paris, performs its first New York concert since 2001, a program centering on the work of "Thibaut de Champagne," the Count of Champagne, Thibaut IV (1201-1253), who was one of the great lyric poets of the 13th century.

            This concert is supported in part by Thurmond Smithgall.

Concerts in the Medieval Sculpture Hall are presented in front of the Museum's Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Crèche.  The exhibition of the crèche is made possible by gifts to The Christmas Tree Fund and the Loretta Hines Howard Fund.

Alla Francesca has just released a recording, Le Chansonnier du roi:  Courtly Love & Chivalry of the 13th Century, and the group will draw from that for this program.  Brigitte Lesne, the group's director/conductor, worked directly from "Le manuscrit du roi" ("The Songbook of the King") at the Bibliothèque nationale to produce a rich musical program with singers and period instruments, including a double-sided harp.

Alla Francesca was founded in 1989 by three members of Ensemble Gilles Binchois:  Brigitte Lesne (voice, harp), Emmanuel Bonnardot (voice, fiddle), and Pierre Hamon (winds).  Their repertoire ranges from the art of the troubadours at the end of the 11th century to the sumptuous polyphonic works of the 15th. They perform by turns as soloists and accompanists, recreating all the diversity of this music and offering lively new readings of the different manuscript sources. In the framework of the Centre de Musique Médiévale de Paris, and through their teaching activities there, the members of the ensemble examine these sources in the light of research carried out by musicologists and themselves.

The concept for the December 13 program at the Metropolitan Museum was suggested by Paula Deitz, author of an upcoming book on Thibaut de Champagne. The program premiered at two sold-out performances at the Cluny Museum in Paris in April 2011.

Tickets:  $60

Sunday, December 16, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. in the Medieval Sculpture Hall

"Modern Medieval" – A Holiday Concert by the JACK Quartet

The acclaimed JACK Quartet-Christopher Otto and Ari Streisfeld, violins; John Pickford Richards, viola; and Kevin McFarland, cello-performs "Modern Medieval," a program featuring both re-arranged and re-imagined music of the Middle Ages, with the world premieres of three new works.  On the program are Rorate Caeli (Gregorian chant used during Advent); Michael Harrison's Chant (world premiere); Guillaume Dufay's Moribus et genere, arranged by John Pickford Richards; Sasha Zamler-Carhart's The St. Francis String Quartets, pieces representing episodes in the life of St. Francis of Assisi (world premiere); Rodericus's Angelorum Psalat, arranged by Christopher Otto; and the world premiere of a new work by Toby Twining.  The Toby Twining work was commissioned through New Music USA's Commissioning Music/USA program.

Concerts in the Medieval Sculpture Hall are presented in front of the Museum's Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Crèche.  The exhibition of the crèche is made possible by gifts to The Christmas Tree Fund and the Loretta Hines Howard Fund.

The JACK Quartet electrifies audiences worldwide with "explosive virtuosity" (Boston Globe) and "viscerally exciting performances" (New York Times). The Washington Post commented, "The string quartet may be a 250-year-old contraption, but young, brilliant groups like the JACK Quartet are keeping it thrillingly vital." JACK has recent and upcoming performances at the SONiC Festival as hosts of the Extended Play Marathon at Miller Theatre, and throughout 2012-14 JACK will join legendary pianist Maurizio Pollini as a part of his Pollini Perspectives series with performances in Europe and Japan.  JACK is focused on the commissioning and performance of new works, leading them to work closely with composers Helmut Lachenmann, György Kurtág, Matthias Pintscher, Georg Friedrich Haas, James Dillon, Toshio Hosokawa, Wolfgang Rihm, Elliott Sharp, Beat Furrer, Caleb Burhans, and Aaron Cassidy.  www.jackquartet.com 
Tickets:  $45

Tuesday, December 18, 2012, at 6:30 & 8:30 p.m. in the Medieval Sculpture Hall

Vienna Boys Choir – Holiday Concert

The famed boys choir performs "Christmas in Vienna," a program of Austrian folk songs, classical works, popular songs, and holiday favorites.

Concerts in the Medieval Sculpture Hall are presented in front of the Museum's Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Crèche.  The exhibition of the crèche is made possible by gifts to The Christmas Tree Fund and the Loretta Hines Howard Fund.

The Vienna Boys Choir traces its beginnings to 1498, when Emperor Maximilian I moved his court and his court musicians from Innsbruck to Vienna.  Today there are around 100 choristers between the ages of 10 and 14, divided into four touring choirs. The four choirs give around 300 concerts and performances each year in front of almost half a million people. Each group spends nine to eleven weeks of the school year on tour around the world. The choir's repertoire includes everything from medieval to contemporary and experimental music. Motets and lieder for boys choir form the core of the touring repertoire, as do the choir's own arrangements of waltzes and polkas by Strauss.  www.wsk.at

Tickets:  Sold out

Friday, December 21, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

New York Philharmonic CONTACT!

Jayce Ogren, conductor, and Elizabeth Futral, soprano

CONTACT!, the New York Philharmonic's new music series, is in its fourth season.  In this first of two programs, Jayce Ogren conducts an all-American program featuring new works by three young composers and a contemporary classic by Jacob Druckman, former NYP composer-in-residence.  The program includes world premieres of New York Philharmonic-commissioned works by Andy Akiho and Jude Vaclavik (SHOCK WAVES); the New York premiere of Andrew Norman's Try (2011); and Jacob Druckman's Counterpoise (ensemble version) (1994), featuring Elizabeth Futral, soprano.

This series is made possible by the Xerox Foundation.

Jayce Ogren is rapidly developing a reputation as one of the finest young conductors to emerge from the States equally at home in both symphonic and operatic repertoire.  A series of high-profile New York City dates in 2012-13 demonstrates beautifully his wide ranging talents:  a Mostly Mozart Festival debut with the groundbreaking International Contemporary Ensemble; and programs with ICE at Columbia University's Miller Theatre (and the Wien Modern Festival); an all-Stravinsky program with the New York City Ballet; and with New York City Opera, new productions of Britten's Turn of the Screw and Rossini's Mosè in Egitto.  A particular recent highlight was stepping in as a last-minute replacement for James Levine to conduct the Boston Symphony Orchestra in a challenging program that included the world premiere of Peter Lieberson's song cycle Songs of Love and Sorrow (with Gerald Finley).  Jayce Ogren biography

Tickets:  $20

Saturday, December 22, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

The Sau-Wing Lam Collection of Violins and Violas in Concert:  Daniel Hope & Karen Gomyo Play Bach

In four concerts during the 2012-13 season, New York's dynamic young Salomé Chamber Orchestra will present programs featuring members and guest artists performing on instruments from The Sau-Wing Lam Collection of Violins and Violas, a selection of which will be on view in the Metropolitan Museum's André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments from December 18, 2012, through June 30, 2013.

            These concerts are generously supported by the Brodsky Family Foundation.

In this program, guest violinists Daniel Hope and Karen Gomyo are the featured soloists in a program of Bach concertos; each will perform a solo violin concerto and will join members of the Salomé Chamber Orchestra in additional works.  Daniel Hope will play the Baltic Guarneri "del Gesù" of 1731.

British violinist Daniel Hope has toured the world as a virtuoso soloist for more than twenty years. He is renowned for his musical versatility and creativity, and for his dedication to humanitarian causes.  Among his many projects is "The Bow Project," a multi-platform documentary and online resource exploring the roots of the violin.  www.danielhope.com

Born in Tokyo, violinist Karen Gomyo grew up in Montreal and New York. Recipient of the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant in 2008, she has been hailed by the Chicago Tribune as "a first-rate artist of real musical command, vitality, brilliance and intensity," and described by the Cleveland Plain Dealer as "captivating, honest, and soulful, fueled by abundant talent but not a vain display of technique."  www.karengomyo.com

The Salomé Chamber Orchestra, New York City's electrifying new conductor-less string ensemble, was formed in September 2009. Founded by the Carpenter siblings (violinists Sean and Lauren and violist David), Salomé is dedicated to advancing the works of both underappreciated and well-recognized chamber composers, and to performing a broad range of repertoire from Baroque to contemporary. Salomé's intelligent, artistic, and interdisciplinary approach to music-making produces refreshing and vibrant performances that attest to the wealth of talent that can be found in this great city and in this generation of musicians.  www.salomechamber.org

Tickets:  $35

Sunday, December 23, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. in the Medieval Sculpture Hall

The Crossing Performs David Lang's Little Match Girl Passion – Holiday Concert

The contemporary choir The Crossing performs David Lang's Little Match Girl Passion, the 2008 Pulitzer Prize-winning work that the New Yorker called "a modern masterpiece."  Also on the program:  James MacMillan's Alpha and Omega (And I Saw a New Heaven); Gabriel Jackson's I Look From Afar ; Bo Holten's First Snow; Kenneth Leighton's  A Hymn to the Nativity ; Jonathan Dove's Three Kings;  Andrew Gant's  What Child is This;  and Robert Convery's Christmas Daybreak. 

            This concert is made possible in part by the Muriel Kallis Steinberg Newman Fund.

Concerts in the Medieval Sculpture Hall are presented in front of the Museum's Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Crèche.  The exhibition of the crèche is made possible by gifts to The Christmas Tree Fund and the Loretta Hines Howard Fund.

David Lang says of his work, "My piece is called The Little Match Girl Passion and it sets Hans Christian Andersen's story The Little Match Girl in the format of Bach's Saint Matthew Passion, interspersing Andersen's narrative with my versions of the crowd and character responses from Bach's Passion. The text is by me, after texts by Han Christian Andersen, H. P. Paulli (the first translator of the story into English, in 1872), Picander (the nom de plume of Christian Friedrich Henrici, the librettist of Bach's Saint Matthew Passion), and the Gospel according to Saint Matthew. The word 'passion' comes from the Latin word for suffering. There is no Bach in my piece and there is no Jesus-rather the suffering of the Little Match Girl has been substituted for Jesus's, elevating (I hope) her sorrow to a higher plane." Read more about the work.

Winner of the 2009 and 2011 ASCAP Awards for Adventurous Programming, The Crossing is a 24-member professional chamber choir conducted by Donald Nally. Formed by a group of friends in 2006, the ensemble was the resident choir of the Spoleto Festival, Italy, in 2007 and has since expanded such collaborations, appearing last September at Miller Theatre of Columbia University in the U.S. premiere of James Dillon'sNine Rivers with the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), at Bang on a Can's first Philadelphia Marathon in 2010, and with Network for New Music during The Crossing's annual Month of Moderns festival in 2012.  www.crossingchoir.com

Tickets:  $60

Every Friday and Saturday, 5:00-8:00 p.m. on the Balcony Bar-Free with admission

ETHEL and Friends

ETHEL, the acclaimed string quartet that Pitchfork.com described as "a necessary jet of cold water in the contemporary classical scene" began as resident ensemble at the Metropolitan Museum's Balcony Bar in October. Marking the first time that a prominent musical group has been featured in that venue, ETHEL will perform there each Friday and Saturday night on a regular basis, sometimes with friends and collaborators, throughout the year. The quartet will also select musical groups from ETHEL's expansive list of notable colleagues to perform when the group is on the road.  This new programming initiative will provide a variety of musical experiences to Met audiences delivered by a range of ensemble types and compositions.

            Click here for the schedule of performers.

The Balcony Bar serves appetizers and cocktails on the second-floor balcony overlooking the Great Hall.  Three sets of performances between 5:00 and 8:00 p.m. will take place each Friday and Saturday.

Free with Museum admission

Talks and Special Gallery Tours

Monday, December 3, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.

Dialogues with Warhol

Gallery Tour of Regarding Warhol:  Sixty Artists, Fifty Years with Marla Prather

Although it has often been claimed that Warhol is the most influential artist of the last half-century, no exhibition has truly examined that assertion in depth.  Marla Prather, Curator in the Met's Department of Modern and Contemporary Art, leads a tour of the exhibition Regarding Warhol, which she co-curated. 

Luncheon with Ms. Prather follows the tour.

This event is part of Warhol Today, a series of concerts, talks, and tours extending Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years, an exhibition exploring Andy Warhol's dominating influence not only in the visual realm but also in performance, media, and pop culture.  The exhibition is on view through December 31, 2012. 

The exhibition is made possible by Morgan Stanley.

Additional support is provided by the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund and The Daniel and Estrellita Brodsky Foundation.

Concert and Lectures programs are made possible by Campbell Soup Company.

            The exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and

the Humanities.

Tickets:  $350 (Limited Availability)

Tuesday, December 4, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

George Bellows, Master Realist

Bellows Beyond the City

H. Barbara Weinberg, Alice Pratt Brown Curator, Department of American Paintings and Sculpture

By the time George Bellows died at age 42, he was deemed one of the greatest artists America had yet produced.  Between 1905 and 1925, he enlisted a vigorous realist style to portray New York City's sites and characters; Maine's rugged coast; the atrocities of World War I; friends and family; and other distinctive subjects.  Bellows' paintings, drawings, and prints are intensely American and yet linked to European works that he studied at home in America-at the Metropolitan Museum, for example-rather than by going abroad.  These two lectures (Nov. 27, Dec 4) by H. Barbara Weinberg, Alice Pratt Brown Curatorof American Paintings and Sculpture explore Bellows's accomplishments in the context of his time and in relation to those of his contemporaries.

            This series is made possible by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund.

            This lecture is offered in conjunction with the exhibition George Bellows, on view November 14, 2012-February 18, 2013.

            The exhibition is made possible by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation.

            The exhibition was organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, in association with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the Royal Academy of Arts, London.

Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $40)

Wednesday, December 5, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

The Ash Can Artist's New York: Times Square & Coney Island

Barry Lewis, Architectural Historian

If George Bellows and his colleagues wanted to paint "le tout New York," he had fertile ground in the new New York of a century ago.  Times Square in the "city," and Coney Island on the ocean shores of Brooklyn, were emerging in the 1900s to serve this new world capital that, unlike the old ones, catered to everyone.  A society for the masses was being created, and New York's two emerging entertainment districts of the early 20th century saw carpenters and their families mingling with accountants and with perhaps a Rockefeller or two thrown into the mix.  This lecture by architectural historian Barry Lewis will look at the architectural frameworks that New York created where the new mass society could have fun, and where Ash Can sensibilities-whether Bellows's or Weegee's-had plenty of material as subjects for their art.

This lecture is offered in conjunction with the exhibition George Bellows, on view November 14, 2012-February 18, 2013.

            The exhibition is made possible by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation.

            The exhibition was organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, in association with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the Royal Academy of Arts, London.

Tickets:  $25

Monday, December 10, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.

Gods, Myths, and Elephants

Gallery Tour of the Indian and Cambodian Galleries with Olivier Bernier

In the course of its long history, India has produced many masterpieces.  The gods and goddesses, the heroes of the Ramayana and the Mahabharata, and, not least, elephants, have been the subjects of sculptors of genius, as has the Buddha.  Then, in the 6th century, as Hinduism and its culture spread to Cambodia, Khmer artists added their own brilliant style to the legacy of India.  As author Olivier Bernier tours the Indian and Khmer galleries, he will discuss not only the works of art, but also the life of one of the world's great civilizations.

            Luncheon with Mr. Bernier follows the tour.

Tickets:  $350 (Limited Availability)

Monday, December 17, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.

Please note:  This event was originally scheduled to take place November 26, 2012.

Gallery Tour of the American Paintings Galleries with Bill T. Jones and Elizabeth Mankin Kornhauser

Tony Award-winning director and choreographer Bill T. Jones and Elizabeth Mankin Kornhauser, Curator in The American Wing, trace the expanding definitions of American art and the Museum's roots as an institution founded in the aftermath of the American Civil War, through works of art in the Museum's new American paintings galleries.

            A luncheon with Mr. Jones and Ms. Kornhauser follows the tour.

Multi-talented artist, choreographer, dancer, theater director, and writer, Bill T. Jones has received major honors ranging from a 1994 MacArthur "Genius" Award to a Kennedy Center Honor in 2010. He was inducted into the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 2009 and named "An Irreplaceable Dance Treasure" by the Dance Heritage Coalition in 2000. His ventures into Broadway theater resulted in a 2010 Tony Award for Best Choreography for the critically acclaimed FELA!, the new musical co-conceived, co-written, directed, and choreographed by Mr. Jones. He also earned a 2007 Tony Award for Best Choreography for Spring Awakening.

Tickets:  $350 (Limited Availability)

  • For tickets, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets or call 212-570-3949.
  • Tickets are also available at the Great Hall Box Office, which is open Tuesday-Saturday 10-4:30 and Sunday noon-5:00.
  • Tickets include admission to the Museum on day of performance.
  • 30 & Under Rush:  $15 tickets for ticket buyers 30 years and younger, with proof of age, the day of the event (subject to availability). For more information, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets, call 212-570-3949, or visit the box office.
  • Bring the Kids!:  $1 tickets for children (ages 7-16) when accompanied by an adult with a full-price ticket (subject to availability).  For more information, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets, call 212-570-3949, or visit the box office.

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